RE: Philanthropy Blog

Interning at the Council on Foundations is giving us a great look at a cross-section of the philanthropic field. The Council’s members, after all, come in all shapes and sizes – large, small, corporate, community foundations, and everything in between. As much as we research them, as much as we hear their names thrown around, the opportunity to actually visit and connect with a member really brought our work into context.

Stephanie McGencey

Girls and young women of color have made important gains in education, health and economic security in recent years. There is cause to celebrate increased graduation rates, higher participation in post-secondary education, reduced rates of teenage pregnancy, and even lower rates of unemployment. However, philanthropy must not assume that their progress means society has effectively addressed the persistent and pervasive nature of the challenges faced by women and girls of color.

Lorne Steedley

With a topic taken from the headlines of today’s newspapers, the Annie E. Casey Foundation Atlanta Civic Site in partnership with the Council on Foundation and the Southeastern Council of Foundations conducted a day long learning forum entitled Flipping the Script: Changing the Narrative on Boys and Men of Color.

Ten years ago this month I waddled – enormously pregnant – into a job interview with the founder of a billion dollar healthcare tech company. “I have this crazy idea about education,” he said.

With Spring Break behind us, making plans for the end of the school year and summer is in full effect...

While the Perrin Family Foundation has spent the past two decades supporting the leadership development of young people in Connecticut, our understanding of and approach to leadership development has undergone a dramatic shift.

Tim moved to the Derby School District toward the end of his sixth-grade year. He was withdrawn and spent most lunch hours alone in the cafeteria. Fellow students made attempts at befriending Tim, but soon found that he could not communicate with them — Tim was deaf and used sign language to communicate.

100 years. A lot happens in 100 years. Just take a moment to imagine life in 1914. An unprecedented World War was just starting. The Great Depression, the Civil Rights movement, and personal computers were still in the future. Even the science fiction of the time couldn’t predict the world of 2014.

On a busy Monday morning, attorney and community advocate Steve Reyes arrives for his first day on the job. Already there are back-to-back meetings and everyone on staff seems to need a few minutes to talk with him. Steve’s job, directing California Community Foundation’s (CCF) newly-created Our Children Relief Fund, leaves him little time to get settled in.

The Richmond Community Foundation began, in 2002, what was to become its largest community initiative: The Nystrom United Revitalization Effort (NURVE). The Foundation began to convene Richmond, California community residents and stakeholders through focus groups, surveys and planning charrettes to develop a vision for the Nystrom community, considered at the time one of the most violent communities in the United States.