Corporate Giving Programs and Foundations

Corporate Philanthropy refers to the investments and activities a company voluntarily undertakes to responsibly manage and account for its impact on society. It includes investments of money, donations of products, in-kind services and technical assistance, employee volunteerism, and other business transactions to advance a social cause, issue, or the work of a nonprofit organization. Corporate foundations and corporate giving programs traditionally play a major role in these areas.

Below is everything on our site for corporate giving programs and foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

As the priorities of a global economy demand that companies evolve and respond in new ways, diversity and inclusiveness play a more critical role in the workplace than ever before. Companies are realizing that thoughtful attention to issues around diversity can offer many benefits, from helping to drive employee retention and productivity to improving the ability to reach new markets. It is also clear that companies can achieve greater outcomes—both business and social—by approaching philanthropy through the lens of diversity.

This document attempts to codify the job functions of private foundation CEOs and the skills and knowledge needed to perform these functions, referred to as competencies.

This board briefing will help your board consider three main questions: what are the advantages and limitations of CEOs on boards? If the CEO is on the board, should he or she have full voting rights? How do your colleagues approach this decision?

Includes job descriptions for President/Chair of the Board, Vice President of the Board, Secretary of the Board, and Treasurer of the Board.

This article will help your board consider three main questions:

  • What are the advantages and limitations of large versus small boards?
  • What size will help us best accomplish our mission?
  • How do our colleagues approach this question?

Although board size varies significantly among different foundation types, this article speaks general-ly to all foundation boards—community, family, independent, public and corporate.

Introduction
Should your foundation board members be compensated for service, or should they serve in a voluntary capacity? Whether you are considering this issue for the first time, or whether it’s a question that has arisen before, compensation has become more than an internal management question. It has become part of keeping the public trust. 

This is a sample Board Member/Trustee job description.

From PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, these publications and resources cover issues surrounding investments other than stocks, bonds and cash.

As the need for scarce grant dollars grows more intense, so does the need to make certain those dollars are spent as effectively as possible. Hence the question of how to evaluate the consequences of grant supported activities has risen to the forefront.

First Steps

What is a private operating foundation?