Independent Foundations

Private foundations make grants based on charitable endowments. The endowment funds come from one or a small handful of sources -- an individual, a family or a corporation. Because of their endowments, they are focused primarily on grantmaking and generally do not raise funds or seek public financial support the way public charities (like community foundations) must.

Private independent foundations are distinct from private family or corporate foundations in that an independent foundation is not governed by the benefactor, the benefactor’s family or a corporation. Of the largest private foundations in the United States, most are independent foundations, although they may have begun as family foundations or were converted from corporate foundations. There is no official IRS or legal definition of independent foundations, so it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for independent foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

This is a sample employee performance appraisal.

This monograph features foundation CEO and trustee reflections on the impact of a broad array of diversity and inclusiveness efforts. They address many of the issues foundation leaders face every day including how to ensure that your grant resources have the most impact possible. The authors have identified diversity and inclusion as important tools in advancing their organizational missions and program goals. Their strategies range from institutional issues such as board development and staffing to community outreach and redefining grantmaking success.

“Lessons from the Field” features the stories, successes and experiences of CEOs and trustees of some of our nation’s leading foundations and corporate grantmaking programs, both large and small. Each has shared their unique perspectives—their struggles and strategies to overcome challenges. They have provided insight into how and to what effect diversity and inclusive practices have been embedded within their organizations.

This document attempts to codify the job functions of private foundation CEOs and the skills and knowledge needed to perform these functions, referred to as competencies.

This board briefing will help your board consider three main questions: what are the advantages and limitations of CEOs on boards? If the CEO is on the board, should he or she have full voting rights? How do your colleagues approach this decision?

Includes job descriptions for President/Chair of the Board, Vice President of the Board, Secretary of the Board, and Treasurer of the Board.

This article will help your board consider three main questions:

  • What are the advantages and limitations of large versus small boards?
  • What size will help us best accomplish our mission?
  • How do our colleagues approach this question?

Although board size varies significantly among different foundation types, this article speaks general-ly to all foundation boards—community, family, independent, public and corporate.

Introduction
Should your foundation board members be compensated for service, or should they serve in a voluntary capacity? Whether you are considering this issue for the first time, or whether it’s a question that has arisen before, compensation has become more than an internal management question. It has become part of keeping the public trust. 

This is a sample Board Member/Trustee job description.

From PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, these publications and resources cover issues surrounding investments other than stocks, bonds and cash.