Independent Foundations

Private foundations make grants based on charitable endowments. The endowment funds come from one or a small handful of sources -- an individual, a family or a corporation. Because of their endowments, they are focused primarily on grantmaking and generally do not raise funds or seek public financial support the way public charities (like community foundations) must.

Private independent foundations are distinct from private family or corporate foundations in that an independent foundation is not governed by the benefactor, the benefactor’s family or a corporation. Of the largest private foundations in the United States, most are independent foundations, although they may have begun as family foundations or were converted from corporate foundations. There is no official IRS or legal definition of independent foundations, so it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for independent foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

The Council submitted comments to the IRS on a proposed rule that outlined a handful of regulations for Type I and Type III supporting organizations. Introduced in February 2016, we identified two proposed regulations that are relevant for our sector:

The Council on Foundations wrote to the Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)  to urge them to prioritize several regulations and guidance documents that impact our members. Each year, the Priority Guidance Plan identifies and prioritizes those tax issues that the agencies should address through regulations or revenue rulings, procedures, notices, and guidance throughout the upcoming year.

Corporate tax integration (“corporate integration”) is a tax reform topic that Senate Finance Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) has been discussing for some time now. Chairman Hatch has indicated his intent to present a corporate integration proposal by the end of June 2016.

What is corporate integration?

Corporate integration is a way of addressing the issue of “double taxation” on corporate income. Under our current system, corporate income is taxed at two levels: the level of corporate profits and the level of shareholder dividends.

Use these resources in your meetings on the Hill and to promote the work back home. Make sure to check back regularly as updates may be released.

Everything you need to know about foundation law in one easy-to-use, regularly updated guide

The Council on Foundations's Compendium of Legal Resources (“Compendium”), is a comprehensive guide to foundation law for the non-lawyer. It is easy to use, self-directed, and regularly updated.

The Council on Foundations partnered with the National Human Services Assembly to provide our members access to the PurchasingPoint® program. PurchasingPoint® is an exclusive discount program for nonprofits that leverages group buying power to access significant savings from your vendors you use every day.

Networking Events

Saturday, April 9

All conference attendees are welcome to attend these preconference events.

Networking Reception for Community Foundations featuring The Harwood Institute

5:15-6:15 p.m. — Georgetown, Concourse Level

Advancing Rural Communities' Economic Success Agenda

8:30-9:30 a.m.

Registration and Overview
  • Stephanie Powers, Senior Director for Policy and Partnerships, Council on Foundations
  • Janet Topolsky, Executive Director, Aspen Institute Community Strategies Group

9:30-10:15 a.m.