Public Foundations

Public foundations are grantmaking public charities that gain their funds from a variety of sources, which may include foundations, individuals, corporations, or public entities. Public foundations may engage in fundraising, and may seek broad public financial support. They may or may not have endowments. There is no legal definition of a public foundation, but most dedicate a significant portion of their annual budgets to grantmaking. Most community foundations are also grantmaking public charities.

Since public foundations may be defined in different ways, and there is no official IRS or legal definition of public foundations, it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for public foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

Individual taxpayers cannot take a charitable deduction for making a gift to an individual, even when channeled through a charitable institution, no matter how deserving of charity the recipient may be.

Dewey Diligence, a program officer at the Acme Community Foundation, was accustomed to having donor advisors call and request that contributions be made to churches and other religious institutions.

When donors to scholarship funds see the impact that their money can have on the life of a student, they are often inspired to contribute more. Sometimes they will add more to the principal of the fund so that future awardees can receive bigger scholarships or more scholarships can be awarded. Where investment losses have reduced the value of the scholarship fund and the amount available to pay out, donors may wish to round up the year’s grants.

Community foundations have proven themselves to be cornerstones of support to the community, especially in times of need and disaster.  When emergencies or disasters strike, the Foundation must be well-prepared to quickly and effectively help itself in order to be able to help others.

This plan outlines the organization’s strategy for responding to emergency or disaster, provides information essential to continuity of critical business functions, and identifies the resources needed to:

The guide aims to inspire individuals and citizen groups to act in organized, effective ways to help people in communities hit by disasters to reclaim their future. It includes concrete suggestions and clear steps towards recovering, rebuilding and re-establishing a sense of security, safety and vitality in these communities.

A guidebook from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund detailing lessons learned from their efforts in the disaster recovery and rebuilding efforts after the rash of tornadoes that devastated Alabama in April 2011.

With the development of the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF), FEMA worked to create systems that can supplement, and not replace, current and ongoing community planning and recovery efforts.

This document is written for those tasked with the development, maintenance, and implementation of a state disaster recovery plan. It is intended to serve as an evaluative guidebook from which users can draw from widely accepted steps derived from planning processes and informative best practices adopted in other states. The Guide also includes a series of questions following each major section of the document that are posed to the reader in order to encourage reflection and an assessment of current activities followed by actions targeting identified issues.

Four stories of how philanthropy responded to national disasters. In each case, organized, strategic giving focused on long-term solutions to the challenges a community faced in disaster.

Moved by widely publicized human suffering and increased disaster aid requests, foundations and corporations are becoming more active in the disaster relief field. Grantmakers have a distinct role to play in disasters because of their ongoing relations with grantees, long-term perspective, flexibility and convening capacity.

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