Public Foundations

Public foundations are grantmaking public charities that gain their funds from a variety of sources, which may include foundations, individuals, corporations, or public entities. Public foundations may engage in fundraising, and may seek broad public financial support. They may or may not have endowments. There is no legal definition of a public foundation, but most dedicate a significant portion of their annual budgets to grantmaking. Most community foundations are also grantmaking public charities.

Since public foundations may be defined in different ways, and there is no official IRS or legal definition of public foundations, it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for public foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

This is a sample Board Member/Trustee job description.

Sample form that might be used by the Board to evaluate the Chief Executive. This sample should be customized to the particular culture and purpose of the agency by modifying the performance criteria as appropriate for the organization, inserting those criteria, and conducting the evaluation using the updated criteria.

This is a sample Board of Directors election and retention policy.

Accepting gifts of real estate, subchapter S corporations, and business interests (including general partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, and limited liability companies). As well as, determining when or if they trigger unrealted business tax (UBIT).

Use this flowchart to determine if grants from donor advised funds require expenditure responsibility.

Community foundations have proven themselves to be cornerstones of support to the community, especially in times of need and disaster.  When emergencies or disasters strike, the Foundation must be well-prepared to quickly and effectively help itself in order to be able to help others.

This plan outlines the organization’s strategy for responding to emergency or disaster, provides information essential to continuity of critical business functions, and identifies the resources needed to:

Developed by the Treasury Guidelines Working Group of Charitable Sector Organizations and Advisors