Children, Youth, and Family

Everyone who works in philanthropy has a different and interesting story of how they “found” the field. For many, it is a story of starting in philanthropy after a long career in another industry. Others tell a different story: you need not wait to become a philanthropist. Around the world, a growing movement of young people is not waiting to be a part of the change made possible by philanthropy.

Carla D. Thompson, the vice president of program strategy at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, writes about the Couples Advancing Together program that the Center for Urban Families offers families who currently receive public benefits through the Maryland Department of Social Services. By providing services such as healthy relationship skill-building, employment assistance and case management services, the program puts fathers in the best position they can be to play an active role in their children’s lives.

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Act of 2010 authorizes funding for federal nutrition programs including: the national school lunch and breakfast program; the nutrition program for women, infants, and children; and other child and adult food care programs. This legislation expired on September 30 and the programs are currently under scrutiny by Congress. In this Policy Preview, the Food Research and Action Center will give an overview of Congressional deliberations and a prognosis for passage. Hear perspectives from peer grantmakers and experts about the importance of federal investment in child nutrition and how it will impact foundations' work on these issues.

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Act of 2010 authorizes funding for federal nutrition programs including: the national school lunch and breakfast program; the nutrition program for women, infants, and children; and other child and adult food care programs. This legislation expired on September 30 and the programs are currently under scrutiny by Congress. In this Policy Preview, the Food Research and Action Center will give an overview of Congressional deliberations and a prognosis for passage. Hear perspectives from peer grantmakers and experts about the importance of federal investment in child nutrition and how it will impact foundations' work on these issues.

Interning at the Council on Foundations is giving us a great look at a cross-section of the philanthropic field. The Council’s members, after all, come in all shapes and sizes – large, small, corporate, community foundations, and everything in between. As much as we research them, as much as we hear their names thrown around, the opportunity to actually visit and connect with a member really brought our work into context.

Girls and young women of color have made important gains in education, health and economic security in recent years. There is cause to celebrate increased graduation rates, higher participation in post-secondary education, reduced rates of teenage pregnancy, and even lower rates of unemployment. However, philanthropy must not assume that their progress means society has effectively addressed the persistent and pervasive nature of the challenges faced by women and girls of color.

With a topic taken from the headlines of today’s newspapers, the Annie E. Casey Foundation Atlanta Civic Site in partnership with the Council on Foundation and the Southeastern Council of Foundations conducted a day long learning forum entitled Flipping the Script: Changing the Narrative on Boys and Men of Color.

Ten years ago this month I waddled – enormously pregnant – into a job interview with the founder of a billion dollar healthcare tech company. “I have this crazy idea about education,” he said.