Family Foundations

The Council on Foundations defines a family foundation as one whose funds are derived from members of a single family, though this is not a legal term and has no precise definition. The Council on Foundations suggests that family foundations have at least one family member serving as an officer or board member of the foundation and, as the donor, that individual (or a relative) must play a significant role in governing and/or managing the foundation. Most family foundations are run by family members who serve as trustees or directors on a voluntary basis. In many cases, second- and third-generation descendants of the original donors manage the foundation.

Family foundations make up over half of all private (family, corporate, independent, and operating) foundations, or 40,456 out of approximately 73,764 foundations (Foundation Center, 2011). Family foundations make up approximately one-third of the Council’s membership.

Family foundations range in asset size from a few hundred thousand dollars to more than $1 billion. The holdings of family foundations total approximately $294 billion, or about 44 percent of all foundation holdings of $662 billion. Despite this, three out of five family foundations hold assets of less than $1 million. Family foundations gave away approximately $21.3 billion in grants in 2011 (The Foundation Center, 2011).

Below is everything on our site for family foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

The 2016 Full Grantmaker Salary and Benefits Report offers the most comprehensive information in the field of grantmaking on compensation levels and salary administration. This report contains:

Strengthening Local Communities to Achieve Global Goals

Overview

There are significant challenges facing communities in the Southwest, including racial inequality in education, economic opportunities and health outcomes.

Leaders from the higher education, philanthropic and corporate sectors will come together for a unique convening designed to explore the impact of implicit bias on leadership and operational excellence.

This convening will seek to accomplish the following objectives:

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This webinar will help our private foundation members understand the rules for how they can participate in public policy advocacy. You will have a chance to listen to researchers from TCC documenting lessons from public policy advocacy campaigns supported by philanthropy.  Consider how your foundation can add value to public policy advocacy and stay within the rules.  

Join us in New York!

Now in its third year, the Endowments and Finance Summit is the premier convening to hear expert insights and have in-depth conversations on the best practices and financial strategies to get a competitive advantage in the philanthropic advisory marketplace. Here’s why you should attend:

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Join us for the second webinar in a series called, “Lunch with Legal Counsel.” Suzanne Friday, Senior Counsel and Vice President of Legal Affairs at the Council on Foundation reviews and explains IRS Code Section 4944: Taxes on investments which jeopardize charitable purpose and what it means for private foundations.

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This webinar introduces an approach to investing for community impact as a shared strategic commitment from the different perspectives of the funder and the grantee nonprofit. Our experts offer best practices for high performance, and Huey & Angelina Wilson Foundation and the City School each share their journeys towards improving outcomes, clarifying specifically what they had to change to move in this direction.

The 2016 Administrative and Program Expense Tables provide foundations with tools to benchmark their expenses – charitable administrative, program service, and qualifying distributions – against peers in the field. Containing data collected through the Council’s 2016 Grantmaker Salary and Benefits Survey, this report offers detailed breakdowns of the data by grantmaker type, staff size, geographic location, and asset group (note – this report does not examine fees associated with fund administration at community foundations).