Independent Foundations

Private foundations make grants based on charitable endowments. The endowment funds come from one or a small handful of sources -- an individual, a family or a corporation. Because of their endowments, they are focused primarily on grantmaking and generally do not raise funds or seek public financial support the way public charities (like community foundations) must.

Private independent foundations are distinct from private family or corporate foundations in that an independent foundation is not governed by the benefactor, the benefactor’s family or a corporation. Of the largest private foundations in the United States, most are independent foundations, although they may have begun as family foundations or were converted from corporate foundations. There is no official IRS or legal definition of independent foundations, so it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for independent foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

Foundation endowment managers faced both challenges and opportunities in 2017 as they worked towards funding the grantmaking practices of their organizations, including a continued increase in scrutiny from policymakers and preparing for the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, as well changes in the market which lead to significantly higher investment returns over previous years.

The House Rules Committee approved a rule for consideration of the Financial Services and Interior/Environment “mini-bus” appropriations bill (H.R. 6147) that refuses to allow debate or action to remove a disingenuous provision that elevates partisan politics over nonprofit missions and undermines effective community problem-solving.

New Data and Trends on International Giving

Did you know that grants by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation account for almost 50% of all international grants awarded by US foundations? Or that between 2011 and 2015, only 12% of funds went directly to local organizations without first flowing through an intermediary?

Sponsors

The Council would like to thank all of the sponsors for their support of the 2018 HR Summit.

If you would like to learn more about becoming a sponsor, contact Luke Scuitto at luke.scuitto@cof.org or 703-879-0617.

Philanthropic leaders from across the country, national charitable organizations, lawmakers, and Congressional staff joined the Philanthropy Caucus for this reception to recognize the role of philanthropy as a unique stakeholder in collective efforts to address some of today's toughest challenges.

The House and Senate Philanthropy Caucuses came together for a social reception as a part of Philanthropy Week in Washington 2016. Representatives from a variety of national charitable organizations, lawmakers, and Congressional staff joined this event to recongize the role of philanthropy as a unique stakeholder in collective efforts to address some of today's toughest challenges.

This reception brought together philanthropic leaders from across the country, philanthropic and nonprofit leaders, Members of Congress, and Congressional staff to celebrate the role of philanthropy as a unique stakeholder in collective efforts to address some of today's toughest challenges.

Part of the Council on Foundations Veterans Philanthropy Series

Leaders from the charitable sector discussed the lessons philanthropy has learned while working to improve veterans' health and mental health.

Leaders from the charitable sector discussed how changes to the tax code could impact charitable giving and the nonprofit sector.

The briefing explored new research conducted by the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University on the unintended effects of such changes on the scope and value of the charitable deduction, and also assessed a policy solution to offset the estimated loss in charitable giving.

A panel of experts spoke on how the charitable deduction plays a critical role in communities and civil society across the country.