Private Foundations

Private foundations make grants based on charitable endowments. The endowment funds come from one or a small handful of sources -- an individual, a family or a corporation. Because of their endowments, they are focused primarily on grantmaking and generally do not raise funds or seek public financial support the way public charities (like community foundations) must.

“Private foundation” is the umbrella term that includes corporate, independent, family, and operating foundations.  As of 2011, there were 73,764 private foundations in the United States (Foundation Center, 2011).  

In 2011, private foundations held more than $604 billion in assets and gave away more than $45 billion (Foundation Center, 2011).  

Below is everything on our site for private foundations. Due to the large number of resources on our website, we highly recommend you use the site navigation or the search feature to find what you are looking for.

Please join us for an important conversation about the climate movement and systemic racism in the United States. We often hear that “durable” US climate policy requires bipartisan buy-in and agreement, but durable policy also requires a movement that can maintain and enhance a functioning democracy. Yet, we also need "meaningful" climate policy, and that will require people power.
The Grantmaker Salary and Benefits Report (GSB) provides salary, benefits, and diversity data for full-time staff at U.S. foundations to aid in budget planning and personnel practice benchmarking. Information is presented by grantmaker type, foundation type, asset size, and geographic location.
Nonprofits and their funders know this challenge all too well—an organization has a great idea, so they begin to seek capital from funders or foundations. They hear the same answer regularly – “It sounds like a great idea. Come back to us after you’re further along.”
In response to a rise in anti-democratic extremism and hate groups in the U.S., the Council on Foundations (Council) today released Values-Aligned Philanthropy: Foundations Resisting Hate and Extremism. The report and accompanying online resource hub are part of the Council’s efforts to prevent hate funding within the philanthropic sector.
In late 2020, the Council on Foundations (the Council) launched the Values-Aligned Philanthropy project to continue to build on their previous efforts within the philanthropic sector to respond to growing concern about the issue of funding hate and extremism. The Council took this step recognizing that while there is significant work being done by grantmakers and social sector leaders across the country to prevent hate funding, there has not been a comprehensive analysis of what has been done and who is doing what from the perspective of philanthropy. The Council believes that mapping the eco-system will provide a baseline for identifying gaps, best practices, and next steps to addressing this problem. The Values-Aligned Philanthropy project is funded by the Gill Foundation. Research and writing for the project have been provided by Roey Thorpe, an independent consultant, with guidance from Council staff.
Join us for the Council's Annual Member Meeting. The Member Meeting will start with keynote remarks from the to-be-announced winner of the Distinguished Service Award, and conclude with a Member Meeting where Kathleen Enright, Council President & CEO, will share the State of the Council and members will vote on the new additions to the Board of Directors.
Bob Jones University recently announced that it will regain its tax-exempt 501(c)(3) status on March 1, 2017. The University lost its tax exemption more than 30 years ago in a landmark Supreme Court case, Bob Jones University v. United States, 461 U.S. 574 (1983), due to racially discriminatory policies that it had at the time. This case is best-known for the adoption of the “Public Policy Doctrine” in the context of Section 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations, which is getting debated these days in the context of same-sex marriage.
Dive into Section 230 of the United States Communications Decency Act with GlobalGiving CEO Alix Guerrier, and discover why it matters to a nonprofit on a mission to accelerate community-led change—and you.
When and how should digital platforms—designed to be open and democratic—take responsibility for the content they host, and when should they take a stance—departing from a position of neutrality? GlobalGiving is on a journey to explore these issues, and is inviting you to join the exploration.