Public Foundations

Public foundations are grantmaking public charities that gain their funds from a variety of sources, which may include foundations, individuals, corporations, or public entities. Public foundations may engage in fundraising, and may seek broad public financial support. They may or may not have endowments. There is no legal definition of a public foundation, but most dedicate a significant portion of their annual budgets to grantmaking. Most community foundations are also grantmaking public charities.

Since public foundations may be defined in different ways, and there is no official IRS or legal definition of public foundations, it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for public foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

The Council on Foundations today announced that Studio in a School Association, a New York City-based program that serves young people by integrating visual arts into teaching and learning, will be awarded the Chapman Prize at its upcoming Awards Ceremony in Washington, D.C. on November 28.

Members, View the Recording

Does your organization provide parking/transportation benefits to employees or do you already file the Form 990-T? If you answered yes to either of those questions, your organization will owe taxes for 2018 and the filing process is going to be different than it was last year. The Council’s government relations and legal experts are teaming up to provide a briefing on:

The Council on Foundations today announced that Stephen Heintz, President of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, will receive the Distinguished Service Award at its upcoming Awards Ceremony in Washington, DC. The Award is philanthropy’s highest honor and celebrates a visionary leader who embodies the inspirational qualities that define excellence in philanthropy—commitment, courage, entrepreneurship, and impact.

Disaster Overview

Hurricane Michael made landfall on the Florida Panhandle as a Category 4 storm that resulted in dangerous storm surge flooding, destructive winds of more than 150 mph and flooding rainfall. As it moved inland, Michael also brought heavy rain and strong winds to other parts of the southeastern United States. Hurricane Michael was the strongest storm to make landfall in the continental U.S. since Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The impacts of the storm has reached