Public Foundations

Public foundations are grantmaking public charities that gain their funds from a variety of sources, which may include foundations, individuals, corporations, or public entities. Public foundations may engage in fundraising, and may seek broad public financial support. They may or may not have endowments. There is no legal definition of a public foundation, but most dedicate a significant portion of their annual budgets to grantmaking. Most community foundations are also grantmaking public charities.

Since public foundations may be defined in different ways, and there is no official IRS or legal definition of public foundations, it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for public foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

In response to a call for input on tax reform from Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee Orrin Hatch (R-UT), the Council submitted comments on behalf of our members detailing our position on a number of tax policy issues that will impact philanthropy and charitable giving. Highlights from these comments include:

On January 27, President Trump issued an Executive Order on "Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements." Since then, there have been protests in cities and airports around the nation, there have been statements from elected officials on both sides of the aisle, and there has been a great deal of discussion via social media.

On January 30, the Council hosted a conference call on President Trump's executive order, its legal underpinnings and challenges, and its impact on foundations and grantees.

A great example of a foundation that has already been active in reaching out to their members in the 115th Congress is the Adirondack Foundation. Click here to see their example of a letter to the Congresswoman representing their district!

This member update focused principally on important issues related to foundation financial management and endowment performance.

Why do the Sustainable Development Goals matter to philanthropy?

These broad global goals address the same problems that our field is tackling: to reduce poverty, improve livelihoods and quality of life, and create a more equitable global society. Looking at the range of issues in the SDGs, all funders can find their work within these collective goals, regardless of what type of foundation you are and whether you fund programs in 90 countries or focus your grantmaking on a specific community in the United States.