Grants Management

Grants management practices should be communicated effectively to external and internal stakeholders, and structured so that opportunities for grantees to achieve success are maximized. The Council has created a number of tools and resources to help support you establish a strong grants management strategy.

In-Depth Topics Under Grants Management:

Grant Evaluation
Grantmaking Policies
Grants to and from Private Foundations
Grants to Individuals
Grants to Non-Charities
Grants to Supporting Organizations
Working with Grantees
Cross-Border Grants

In-Depth knowledge on Grants Management

The grantmaking application process is a big lift for foundations and nonprofits, alike. This primer takes a look at streamlining the application process from RFP to grant agreement. Found in the guide is a how to on creating RFPs, questions to ask during the grant application review, sample acceptance letter, sample declination letter, and a sample grant agreement. Highlighted here, you will also find an innovative example a group of funders from New Mexico (SHARE New Mexico) took in reevaluating their long standing grantmaking application process and the steps they took in creating and implementing a common application. Finally, we invite you to explore the resources and tools available through GMN's Project Streamline initiative, an effort to assist funders in right-sizing application and reporting requirements, reducing the burden on grantseekers, and seeking feedback to improve grantmaking practices.

Hosted in partnership with GuideStar, this webinar will discuss the various ways data standards are already improving the grantmaking process for both funders and grantees. Conversation will also address how foundations can participate in these initiatives and promote a better information system for the sector.

Communities across the country are experiencing rapid demographic shifts, and foundations that use place-based giving strategies must adapt their grantmaking to recognize these changes. This discussion explores the multiple ways foundations define place-based philanthropy, its potential challenges and advantages, and the various approaches to this work.

This checklist for developing effective grantee relations was prepared by Jane Kendall, president of the North Carolina Center for Nonprofits and a trustee of the Kathleen Price Bryan Family Fund.

From the Center for Effective Philanthropy, most of foundations’ efforts to contribute ‘beyond the money’ have little beneficial impact on grantees. More than Money: Making a Difference with Assistance Beyond the Grant reveals that only when foundation staff provide assistance beyond the grant in one of two ways do grantees report a substantially more positive experience with their funders. Three exemplary foundations are profiled: Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, Winter Park Health Foundation, and the Wallace Foundation.

From Grantcraft, whether it's introducing new ideas into your foundation or offering constructive feedback to a grantee, grantmakers can develop personal strategies to meet the "soft" challenges of grantmaking. Effective personal strategy helps practitioners use their understanding of self and role - as learner, analyst, bridge builder - to manage the tensions that come with the job. In this guide, contributors discuss the elements of personal strategy and how it helps grantmakers to leverage their strengths in service to their objectives. The guide also explores why some grantmakers are able to think and work like "naturals" - and how the rest of us can emulate their style.

While philanthropy that crosses national borders has much in common with its domestic counterpart, it also differs in significant and challenging ways. Language differences, communication across vast distances, unfamiliar cultural values and perspectives, multiple legal systems, and disparate accounting practices are a few of the factors that distinguish international from local or national philanthropy and contribute to its complexity. Moreover, international philanthropy takes place against a complex backdrop of international politics, geo-power dynamics, government stipulations, and cultural and religious traditions, with a potentially greater degree of uncertainty and unpredictability. However, with the high level of need and the cross-border nature of many of the challenges the world faces today, there is also a greater sense of responsibility and a tremendous opportunity to make a difference with even modest contributions. In view of these challenges, how can independent funders ensure that their international philanthropy is carried out in an accountable and responsible manner?