Full Session Calendar

  • All Days
  • Friday, June 6
  • Saturday, June 7
  • Sunday, June 8
  • Monday, June 9
  • Tuesday, June 10
  • Wednesday, December 31

Friday, June 6

8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Energizing Private Partnerships at the Federal Level

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

The session will examine the variety of efforts by the federal government to accelerate partnerships with foundations and corporations across a diverse set of agencies and departments. In particular, it will look at the ways in which federal agencies and their leaders are creating mechanisms that will catalyze cross-sectoral collaboration, their roles and responsibilities, the conditions that increase the probability of success, and lessons learned to date. Findings from a recent study conducted by The Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy at the University of Southern California will be discussed and implications for practice will be explored.

If you wish to attend you must RSVP to Nicholas Williams, Nicholas.Williamsprice.usc.edu

Speaker(s): James Ferris, Director, The Center on Philanthropy & Public Policy

1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Essential Skills and Strategies Course

Kalorama, Lobby Level

Essential Skills & Strategies (ESS) for New Grantmakers is a comprehensive educational program. For new grantmakers, the course will help to familiarize participants with the foundation world and the field of philanthropy. For seasoned grantmakers, it will act as a refresher. Designed by experts in the philanthropic sector, ESS is the field's standardized orientation for grantmakers. The sessions are designed to provide grantmakers with the knowledge, insight, skills, and tools to be effective in their work.

Speaker(s): Satonya Fair, Director, Grants Management, The Annie E. Casey Foundation; Lori Fuller, Director, Evaluation and Research, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust; Colburn Wilbur, Trustee, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation

Saturday, June 7

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Essential Skills and Strategies Course - Day 2

Kalorama, Lobby Level

Essential Skills & Strategies (ESS) for New Grantmakers is a comprehensive educational program. For new grantmakers, the course will help to familiarize participants with the foundation world and the field of philanthropy. For seasoned grantmakers, it will act as a refresher. Designed by experts in the philanthropic sector, ESS is the field's standardized orientation for grantmakers. The sessions are designed to provide grantmakers with the knowledge, insight, skills, and tools to be effective in their work.

Speaker(s): Satonya Fair, Director, Grants Management, The Annie E. Casey Foundation; Lori Fuller, Director, Evaluation and Research, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust; Colburn Wilbur, Trustee, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Public Policy Seminar

We've designed this seminar for our members and colleagues who work in policy and advocacy. This intensive one-day workshop will dive into the art of developing an effective strategy to address complex, multi-issue legislation. We will use Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp's Tax Reform Act of 2014 as our launching off point for the discussion.

Space for this event is limited. For more information or to express your interest in participating, please contact govtcof.org.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Lisa Danielson, Senior Project Manager, Gogerty Marriott; Matthew Dolan, Director, The Federal Policy Group; Gloria Johnson-Cusack, Executive Director, Leadership 18; Abby Levine, Legal Director, Bolder Advocacy, Alliance for Justice; Cindy Lott, Senior Counsel, Columbia Law School National State Attorneys General Program; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Gina Russo, , Gogerty Marriott; Sue Santa, Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Legal Affairs, Council on Foundations; Sean Walsh, Public Relations, Carl S. Mink, CPA P.A.; Steven Woolf, Tax Counsel, United Jewish Communities

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

CEO/Board Retreat

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

This one-day gathering is designed to give foundation CEOs and board members an opportunity to engage with their peers in thoughtful, candid, and off-the-record conversations. Conversation topics will touch on the current and complex issues facing philanthropy, as well as the burning challenges that keep you - a foundation leader - up at night. Participants will establish new relationships, reconnect with peers, and broaden their network of colleagues in the field.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Thaler Pekar, CEO, Thaler Pekar and Partners LLC; Marta Siberio, President, Marta Siberio Consulting

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Women, Leadership, and Social Change

Monroe, Concourse Level

Today&rsquos leaders in the business and social change sectors must address difficult challenges in their own lives, in their organizations, and in their communities. Research shows that while women possess the talents and skills needed to successfully tackle these complex problems, their assets are often overlooked and undervalued. Women Transforming Leadership (WTL) offers an energizing and holistic leadership session that will help women leaders in philanthropy discover and enhance their natural abilities to create and advance social change. This session is modeled on the successful program developed and offered by Oxford University&rsquos Said Business School. The session will also offer the opportunity to develop an active network for guidance and peer support with session leaders and other participants to reinforce best practices once back at the office.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation; Sujata Lamba, Director, FPD and Global Competitive Industries, The World Bank; Michele Ozumba, President and CEO, Women's Funding Network; Gayle Peterson, Senior Managing Director, Partners For Change; K. Sujata, President/CEO, Chicago Foundation For Women

6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Global Grantmaking Reception and Dinner

Reception: 6:30-7:30 Enjoy wine, hors d'oeuvres, and great conversation during this festive reception, with an opportunity to make connections with new colleagues.

Dinner: 7:30 - 9:00 With the resources of both governments and traditional philanthropy barely growing or in decline and the problems of poverty, ill-health, and environmental degradation ballooning daily, it is increasingly clear that new models for financing and promoting social and environmental objectives are urgently needed. Fortunately, a significant revolution appears to be underway on the frontiers of philanthropy and social investing that is providing at least a partial response to this dilemma. Salamon's talk, based on his new book Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing (April 2014, Oxford University Press) will discuss the new actors and new tools reshaping philanthropy and social investment, an analysis of the forces promoting these developments, and a discussion of how foundations are reshaping the way we support solutions to social and environmental problems throughout the world.

Sunday, June 8

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Corporate Breakfast - Increasing Impact, Enhancing Value Corporate Philanthropy Trends Update

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

This networking breakfast - which is specifically designed for program and corporate giving officers and foundation leaders - offers an opportunity to review current and emerging trends in corporate philanthropy. In 2012, the Council launched Increasing Impact, Enhancing Value, a report on trends in corporate philanthropy. While you connect with peers, hear what has changed since the 2012 report and how the field is evolving.

Engage with your peers in a discussion on &ldquoBig Data&rdquo as a philanthropic trend. Explore and candidly discuss with experts how giving trends and the ethical use of &ldquoBig Data&rdquo present opportunities to create value and build societal trust for corporate philanthropy. Learn ways to avoid misuses of data that could lead to fracturing philanthropy and our society.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Jacob Gayle, Vice President, Medtronic Foundation and Medtronic Community Affairs, Medtronic Foundation; Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary: The State of the Nation: American History, Identity and Politics

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

According to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is comprised of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots. Learn how the battle lines of today's debates over social issues were shaped by our past and continue to mold our future. Examine the current state of opinions among the population and hear how the cultures of these distinct nations directly impact philanthropy as a field, our work in communities we serve, and the greater good.

Speaker(s): Jim Clifton, CEO, The Gallup Organization; Carly Hare, Executive Director , Native Americans in Philanthropy; Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation; Carol Larson, President and CEO, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Colin Woodard, , Award-Winning Author & Journalist

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Roundtable Discussion with the Department of Agriculture

Independence, Lobby Level

Our nation's U.S. Department of Agriculture and its significant resources impact most sectors of American life in cities and small towns, whether it is the food we eat, the energy we consume, the water we drink, the homes we build, or the places we recreate. The Department is exploring ways to collaborate more effectively with funders, so that its significant financial investments can be deployed to maximum impact. Please join us for an informal discussion about issues of interest to you and explore how this large federal agency could collaborate in your field. Topics could include: local food systems, child nutrition, land and water conservation, climate strategies, renewable energy, economic research, rural and tribal economic development, social equity in rural communities.

We will be joined by Chris Beck, Senior Projects Advisor at USDA.

12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Luncheon Plenary: Examining the State of Philanthropy

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

Part I Experiencing Life in a Polarized and Fractured Society

This two-part plenary session will continue the discussion started in the opening plenary session but from a different perspective. Gwen Ifill, journalist, author and managing editor of The PBS Newshour will moderate a conversation with students of The News Literacy Project - Carlos McKnight, Stewart Gray, Nabani Ashraf, Margaret Sella, Yashodhar Govil and Angie Ames - a national educational program that mobilizes seasoned journalists to work with educators to teach students to sort fact from fiction, on how they experience life in an increasingly polarized and fractured society.

Part II - Examining the State of Philanthropy

What is the State of Philanthropy in 2014? What can we expect in the next 10 years? Or in the next 50?

Philanthropy has been credited for blazing the trail on any number of social issues, from school reform, building hospitals and schools, as well as advancing medical research. Often, we tell these tales of success from a historical perspective looking back on the accomplishments.

But what about today and the years ahead? Philanthropy is in a state of evolution that must keep pace with the frenetic world around us. With a panel of leaders from a cross-section of philanthropic organizations, explore how we are reshaping, reimagining, and reframing the way we advance our missions while keeping true to the strong traditions, legacies, and values that have made American philanthropy a keystone for the world. We'll navigate the accomplishments, challenges, advances, and failures, as well as the issues on our minds today as we look to the future.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Mary Galeti, Vice Chair, Tecovas Foundation; Jonathan Greenblatt, Director, White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation, The White House; Gwen Ifill, Journalist, Managing Editor, Managing Editor, "The PBS Newshour"; Sherry Magill, President, Jessie Ball duPont Fund; Stacy Palmer, Editor, Chronicle of Philanthropy; Vikki Spruill, President & CEO, Council on Foundations; Steven Teles, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

2:40 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

Philanthropic, Federal and Tribal Partnerships for Recovery of the Santa Clara Canyon and Ancient Tribal Lands

Piscataway, Lobby Level

Hosted by: Stephanie Powers, Federal Executive Branch Liaison, Council on Foundations

  • Guests: Carly Hare CEO, Native Americans in Philanthropy
  • Denise Morgan Gilliam Federal Emergency Management Agency, Recovery Division Director
Here is the story

The Khap'on Towa - the indigenous people of Santa Clara Pueblo, NM - are engaged in a monumental effort to restore their once-verdant Santa Clara Canyon and revitalize their ancient land-based culture in the aftermath of the cataclysmic Las Conchas wildfire. This fire was the most destructive of four catastrophic fires over 13 years that altogether have charred 80% of their watershed.

Instead of succumbing to hopelessness, Santa Clara Pueblo has decided that with every slope stabilized, every seedling planted, every habitat restored - the restoration of their beloved Canyon will mark the revival and rebirth of their ancient culture. While some may feel powerless to affect the global decline in cultural diversity and the devastation of climate change, in Khap'o Owingeh there is an opportunity to make a profound difference in sustaining the unique Tewa language and way of life by ensuring the future safety of their community, by restoring their canyon and protecting the last remaining forests in their ancestral homeland.

Come and learn more about the diverse and growing group of federal, state and non-profit partners coming together with the Pueblo's civic leadership to support an unprecedented, ambitious, multi-generational initiative. Receive a special invitation from the Governor of the Santa Clara Pueblo, J. Michael Chavarria to be a guest for their traditional Feast Day on August 12, 2014 and to join a national roundtable on Philanthropic, Federal and Tribal Partnerships for Disaster Recovery, including a tour of the canyon and the impacted lands. The New Mexico Community Foundation and the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Disaster Recovery Office are co-sponsoring the convening.

An important endeavor because

The people of Khap'o Owingeh have called the Jemez Mountains, Pajarito Plateau and Rio Grande Valley home for millennia. They are among only 6,000 people on Earth who sustain the Tewa language and culture. Their way of life is deeply interwoven with the Santa Clara Canyon the small stream it feeds has quenched their thirst and irrigated their farmlands, the elk and deer it nurtures have provided them with food, the plants and trees that climb its steep slopes yielded healing medicines and the heat for homes, and its sacred sites and ancient villages connect them with their ancestors. They cannot be who they are without their land.

The forces of climate change did not begin with Santa Clara and they cannot confront its impact alone. It will take an innovative partnership with federal and state agencies, conservation organizations and foundations to protect Santa Clara's community, restore their lands and help sustain their culture.

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Afternoon Plenary: Inequality, A Polarized Society, and Young Men of Color

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

On the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, efforts by institutional philanthropy to advance positive social change continue to require the confrontation of barriers and hard truths about inequality. Invoke the matter of race, and philanthropy finds itself navigating difficult waters, and particularly so in the context of a deeply polarized political landscape in our nation.

This two-part session begins with a keynote address by Secretary of Labor Tom Perez, who will speak to how the Obama Administration views and confronts the issues of poverty and inequality across our nation, and how the President's recently-announced My Brother's Keeper initiative focusing on the crisis of young men of color seeks to improve outcomes in one segment of America's vulnerable populations.

Following the Secretary's remarks, a panel discussion of foundation CEOs will offer observations about the Presidential initiative, and speak to why and how these foundations are taking action to address the issue. Questions and discourse about inequality, diversity, race, gender as well as navigating the politics of our polarized society through public-private partnership are certain to be raised in this stimulating conversation.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Emmett Carson, CEO and President, Silicon Valley Community Foundation; Antonia Hernandez, President & CEO, California Community Foundation; Patrick McCarthy, President & CEO, The Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Thomas Perez, Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor; Jim Shelton, Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Education; La June Tabron, President and CEO, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation

6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Meet & Mingle Networking Reception

Join the Council and fellow attendees on the Heights Patio of the Hilton Hotel. We are creating an East Coast Boardwalk! Explore the boardwalk with the sounds of an acapella performance by The Capital Singers and capture a fun photo of yourself in the photo booth, all while enjoying complimentary beer, wine, and hors d'oeuvres.

Feel free to come casually comfortable to this evening of fun.

Monday, June 9

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Networking Breakfast

Breakfast can be found in both the International Ballroom and Council Central. Please feel free to sit by your foundation type to make new connections.

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Education & Philanthropy: Opportunity & Impact

International Ballroom West & Center, Concourse

When done right, education is the ultimate equalizer, but when done wrong, it can be the protector of stratification. Society has struggled for years to level the playing field for all children in order to ensure equal access and opportunity. In a polarized society that is facing astounding workforce and technological changes, education has become a commodity that determines fates of individuals, cultures, cities, regions, and nations. Examine the history of education and its reform effort, and discuss what's on the horizon for the education field and what's needed from philanthropy regarding this polarizing topic.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): David Johns, Executive Director, White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans; Jeff Johnson, Chief of Strategy, Illume Communications; Holiday McKiernan, Chief of Staff and General Counsel, Lumina Foundation; Marc Sternberg, Director K-12 Education Reform, Walton Family Foundation, Inc.

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Election 2014: What's Really at Stake?

Columbia 11 & 12, Terrace Level

The 2014 midterm elections are five short months away, and the 2016 presidential race is already heating up. To help make sense of the horse-race stories and put this year's election into a larger context, join our seasoned group of pundits, pollsters, and prognosticators for a lively conversation about what's really at stake in the coming months - and what changes election night might bring.

Speaker(s): Jonathan Capehart, Opinion Writer, The Washington Post Company; Christopher Gates, President, Sunlight Foundation; Juleanna Glover, Managing Director, Teneo Intelligence, Teneo Holdings LLC; Miles Rapoport, President and CEO, Common Cause

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Inside the 50th Anniversary of the War on Poverty

Lincoln East & West, Concourse Level

Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war on poverty in his State of the Union address, the U.S. poverty rate has fallen only to 15 percent from 19 percent, which means 46 million Americans live in households whose income is barely adequate. Philanthropy has been a tireless champion in the war on poverty, leading the innovation of new connections, programs and models. This concurrent plenary will examine the current state of poverty, discuss the role philanthropy has played over the last 50 years of anti-poverty endeavors, as well as what the next 50 years hold for groups working in the field.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Robert Doar, Morgridge Fellow in Poverty Studies, American Enterprise Institute (AEI); Terri Freeman, President, The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region; Marva Hammons, Executive Vice President of Child and Family Services, Casey Family Programs; Patty Stonesifer, Senior Advisor to the Trustees, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Making Rights Real: Civic Literacy, Media Access, and the Democratic Imperative

International Ballroom East, Concourse Level

More than 50 years since Congress enacted transformative civil and voting rights laws to fully enfranchise all Americans, our rate of voter participation lags behind other Western democracies. Long lines on Election Day are the most visible symptom of this deeper dysfunction. Examine the ways in which current community structure - like schools and the media - as well as public policies hinder and could do more to enhance democratic vibrancy.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Cornell Brooks, President & CEO, New Jersey Institute For Social Justice; Michael Copps, Special Advisor, Media and Democracy Reform Initiative, Federal Communications Commission; Joe Goldman, Director, Democracy Fund; Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO, Voto Latino; Cindy Lott, Senior Counsel, Columbia Law School National State Attorneys General Program; James Silkenat, President, American Bar Association

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Reforming Health Care in Challenging Environments

Jefferson, Concourse Level

Following the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), grantmakers from across the country are leading important efforts to improve the health of all people. Participate in a dynamic and engaging talk-show style session featuring philanthropic leaders who will share their role in leading from behind, in-front and from the middle to identify key partners to overcome barriers and obstacles in real system change efforts. Gain new insights from session participants in highly-participatory solution-focused small group discussion sessions to identify new ideas for ACA implementation in states that are not participating in an exchange or have opted not to expand Medicaid coverage. Hear from leaders of Grantmakers in Health about the complexities of the law and efforts to help funders navigate ACA implementation in challenging environments.

Speaker(s): Chris Adams, President, Engaged Public; Ryan Barker, Vice President of Health Policy, The Missouri Foundation for Health; Ann McMillan MSW, Program Associate, Grantmakers In Health

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

The Death and Life of the Environmental Movement: City-Regions Rising

Georgetown, Concourse Level

Speaker(s): David Orr, Paul Sears Distinguished professor of Environmental Studies and Politics, Oberlin College; Richard Stuebi, President & CEO, The Cleveland Foundation

10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Monitor Institute: What's Next for Community Philanthropy

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Civil Legal Aid: A Natural Ally in Tackling Poverty

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

For decades, all over the country, legal aid groups - problem solvers by nature -have been making real change for millions of people. When families need housing, food, or health care, these groups have answers. It is their hard work that corrects bad policy and changes how society treats the most vulnerable. Yet, as a group they are often ignored.

As the gap between the rich and poor continues to grow, civil legal aid is one of the best tools we have to tackle poverty. But unlike serious criminal cases, civil cases do not guarantee a right to counsel, and funding that for decades has sustained legal aid work is now in a state of crisis. 

Yet, opportunities abound. New and innovative programs are reshaping the field and helping more people. Today, civil legal aid is being used as a key strategy to increase the impact of funders&rsquo support in all areas of poverty.

This session will focus on creative solutions to assure access to justice for those living in poverty. Panelists will discuss current barriers, exciting new innovations, and ways to use civil legal aid as a key strategy to bolster foundation programming.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Martha Bergmark, Executive Director, Voices for Civil Justice; Deepak Bhargava, Executive Director, Center for Community Change; James Head, President & CEO, East Bay Community Foundation; Mary McClymont, President, Public Welfare Foundation; James Sandman, President, Legal Services Corporation; Eric Washington, Chief Judge, District of Columbia Court of Appeals

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Complicated Times: Speech and Advocacy in a Changing Environment

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

Our democracy relies upon an informed citizenry and equal access to the political process to thrive. Nonprofits play an important role in educating the public about critical policy and election issues that impact their lives, and foundations often fund these efforts.

In recent years, a number of issues that have a profound impact on how Americans may engage in the political and electoral process have taken center stage. A common thread through these issues the First Amendment and freedom of speech. The Supreme Court decisions in Citizens United and this year's McCutcheon opinion, along with increased scrutiny of the political activity of 501(c)(4) organizations by the Internal Revenue Service, have highlighted fundamental freedom of speech issues from different angles. This confluence of policy activity provides us with a unique starting point for a discussion on the political process, campaign finance issues and the influence of average and not-so-average Americans.

Join our campaign finance and First Amendment experts as we delve into the implications of these policy changes for charitable organizations, and more broadly, for our country's political process. Our panelists will connect the dots among campaign finance law, First Amendment free speech principles, 501(c)(4) regulation, and grassroots advocacy. And most importantly, they'll explain why grantmakers should care about our country's rapidly evolving political finance system.

Speaker(s): Truman Anderson, Executive Director, Stuart Family Foundation; Diana Aviv, President and CEO, Independent Sector; Christopher Gates, President, Sunlight Foundation

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Donors and Scientists Collaborate for Brain Health

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

Donor and family foundation collaboration can be a highly effective strategy in pooling and deploying philanthropic capital with shared short- and long-term outcomes in mind. Join a fascinating discussion on how a group of donors joined forces to tackle the most challenging neurological disorders of our time. Faced with personal and family challenges, these donors have ushered in an exciting time for neuroscience and mental health research and discoveries.

Learn about the donor collaborative model that has been called a venture model of philanthropy. This model deployed over 300M in grants to cutting edge research that produced real innovation, discovery, and hope, as well as an additional 3 billion in resources from government and other funding entities.

Speaker(s): Jeffrey Borenstein, President & CEO, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation; Wayne Farmer, Advisor, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation; Bonnie Hammerschlag, Trustee, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation; Faith Rothblatt, Associate Director, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Lots of Cars in the Garage: Using Multiple Vehicles for Good

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

Many individuals and families now use a range of different giving and investing vehicles in addition to the old standby of foundation grants:

  • individual check-writing of individual trustees
  • donor-advised funds in various places
  • impact investing by the foundation or by individuals
  • giving circles
  • family governed operating organizations and social enterprises
  • planned giving instruments
  • anonymous giving
  • corporate giving by the family business
  • other new innovations in giving
This session will explore how some families and foundations are managing and coordinating their often complicated portfolio of activities, and how some individuals effectively juggle multiple approaches of their own. Panelists will talk about how they coordinate multiple vehicles and people, how they manage the risk and reward of adding non-traditional vehicles, and how they deal with conflicts between individuals, between vehicles when they arise.

Speaker(s): Cedric Brown, CEO, Kapor Center For Social Impact; Mary Galeti, Vice Chair, Tecovas Foundation; Elenore Garton, Director of Strategy and Philanthropic Partnerships, Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation; Michael Moody, Frey Chair for Family Philanthropy, Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy, , Johnson Center For Philanthropy; Chet Tchozewski, Board Member, Chino Cienega Foundation

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Family Philanthropy and Impact Investing: Are Intermediaries the Answer?

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

When a family foundation decides to make impact investments often known as program-related or mission-related investments made into companies, organizations, and funds with the intention to generate measurable social and environmental impact alongside a financial return how does the foundation decide whether to make impact investments directly, or do so through an intermediary? Some foundations, especially those with limited staff capacity, see direct investment as too burdensome and risky and opt to invest through intermediaries. Others recognize the benefits that come from direct investment and champion that method. This session, focused on the unique considerations of family foundations, will offer an introduction to impact investing from industry leaders, then explore the challenges and benefits of making impact investments directly or investing through intermediaries like Community Development Financial Institutions. Learn how family foundations can make catalytic investments and hear about past investment experiences from family foundations.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Melanie Audette, Deputy Director, Mission Investors Exchange; Peter Brach, Program Advisor and Analyst, Brach Family Charitable Foundation; Abhilash Mudaliar, Research Manager, Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN); Cynthia Muller, Director, Impact Investing, Arabella Philanthropic Investment Advisors

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Foundations, Collaboration, and the Post-2015 Agenda

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

The global challenges facing humanity on issues such as poverty, health, equality, and environmental sustainability require collaboration between philanthropic entities, private organizations, and governments. Following the United Nations Millennium Summit in 2000, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were established as targets for global efforts to address these most pressing problems. All 189 United Nations member states at the time made commitments to support efforts to achieve these goals by 2015.

As 2015 approaches, governments, intergovernmental organizations, and representatives from various sectors have begun considering a framework that would replace the MDGs. Leaders from the philanthropic, private, and public sectors agree that the Post 2015 Agenda goals - commonly referred to as Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - must be developed in a collaborative manner that engages all stakeholders and considers how the SDGs will link social, economic, and environmental dimensions of well-being. 

This session builds upon a March 2014 meeting of foundations and networks interested in greater collaboration around the post-2015 Agenda. The discussion will focus on the Sustainable Development Goals, examples of other global efforts that involve philanthropy, and offer insights for how more funders can participate in the development of the SDGs that will guide a huge share of aid for the next 15 years.

Speaker(s): Edmund Cain, Vice President, Grant Programs, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation; Robert Garris, Managing Director, The Rockefeller Foundation; Heather Grady, Independent Philanthropy Advisor, Independent Philanthropy Advisor; Penelope Lewis, Head of Global Foundations Program, The World Bank; Karolina Mzyk, Program Specialist, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP); Bradford Smith, President, Foundation Center

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

News Literacy: A Case Study in the Role of Philanthropy in a Divided Democracy

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

Examine the emerging field of news literacy, which provides students with the critical-thinking skills to know what to believe in the digital age and the tools to become more engaged and informed citizens. The panel, which features some of the news literacy's earliest funders and leading practitioners, will address the mission's importance to education, the future of quality journalism, and the health of the country's democracy.

Speaker(s): Alison Bernstein, Vice President, Knowledge, Creativity & Freedom, Rutgers University; David Hiller, President and CEO, McCormick Foundation; Alan Miller, President and CEO, The News Literacy Project; Howard Schneider, Dean, School of Journalism, Stony Brook University; Ray Suarez, Journalist, Al Jazeera America, LLC

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Teaching Adolescents to Become Learners: The Role of Noncognitive Factors in Shaping School Performance

As Paul Tough wrote in the recent New York Times Magazine piece entitled Who Gets to Graduate, Rich Kids Graduate Poor Kids Don't. Tough writes that only about a quarter of first-year college students from the bottom half of the income distribution earn a baccalaureate degree by the time they are 24. Though the statistics are grim, a number of new efforts across the education spectrum are focusing on student attitudes and beliefs about learning-called academic mindsets-to help learners persist through challenge, complete courses and earn better grades. This panel will explore several efforts, including new research networks and a major national initiative that integrates mindsets into pedagogy. The session also will explore the role of foundations in building this new field.

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The Strange Life & Death of Bipartisan Environmentalism

International Ballroom East, Concourse Level

Get a social and political overview of the recent history of the American environmental agenda, with special attention paid to the particular roles played by foundations and individual grantors. How did we get so stuck? Do we dare to dream of bipartisan environmentalism? On which issues, and through which lenses?

Speaker(s): Deb Callahan, Director, Colorado River Sustainability Campaign; Conn Nugent, Principal, The J.M. Kaplan Fund, Inc.; Thomas Wathen, Vice President, Environment, The Pew Charitable Trusts

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Washington Update: Tax Reform is Coming - What Now?

Monroe, Concourse Level

Curious about how the fast-paced, animated, and sometimes-dysfunctional D.C. policy environment can trickle down to influence your work? Do you wonder about whether tax reform will ever happen and, when it does, how these changes will impact philanthropy? Come hear how the decisions being made here in our nation's capital affect the work you do in your community! 

Momentum is building for a major overhaul of our tax code, and it is imperative for philanthropic organizations to weigh in on the conversation. In February, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-MI-4) released his tax reform discussion draft, with many proposed changes that would have a direct bearing on individuals' giving incentives as well as the way in which tax-exempt organizations go about their business. In the Senate, Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden (D-OR) has expressed strong interest in tax reform. Action on the regulatory front and the expiration of tax extenders will add additional topics to the discussions.

Our panel of D.C. insiders will dive into these issues and discuss why they matter to you. Come hear how you can engage on these issues and ensure your voice is heard.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Suzanne Friday, Senior Counsel and V.P. of Legal Affairs, Council on Foundations; Alexander Reid, Of Counsel, Morgan Lewis; Sue Santa, Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Legal Affairs, Council on Foundations; Eugene Steuerle, Institute Fellow, The Urban Institute; Mark Warren, Tax Counsel, Committee on Ways and Means, United States House of Representatives

11:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

WRAG Affordable Housing Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

The need for defining what affordable housing is as well as providing opportunities to access these resources is a multi-pronged issue critical to assisting many families in combating poverty. Prince George's County's leadership is tackling this issue head-on through its Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative (TNI). The tour, conducted in collaboration with the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers, will take participants to Langley Park, MD to a housing development which is part of the Prince George's County Executives Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative (TNI). TNI is directing a full spectrum of cross-agency resources in six unique communities that face some of the greatest challenges associated with crime, school statistics, and health care disparity. We will hear from affordable housing experts, and housing and community development practitioners to learn how TNI, as well as current and previous housing and community development efforts, are transforming and strengthening communities and where there is more work to be done to improve neighborhood housing, education, health, and safety.

12:00 p.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Poverty Interrupted: A Behavioral Approach to Help Children Escape Poverty

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

12:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Junior Achievement Finance Park

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

In a time when the United States is challenged with staying globally competitive, it is our young people that we must prepare to be future business leaders, entrepreneurs and innovators starting with empowering them to own their economic success early in life. The tour will take participants by bus to Junior Achievement Finance Park in Fairfax, VA. In concert with Fairfax County Public Schools, and with the support of the local business community, Junior Achievement constructed a state-of-the-art 20,000 square-foot facility on the Frost-Woodson Campus in Fairfax, Virginia delivering high-tech, high-touch financial educational experiences to more than 14,000 middle school students each year. The tour will take the group through the facility, discuss the mission and importance of this resource for youth in schools as well as for adults in alternative education programs, and will also discuss the multi-sectorial partnerships at play to make this program a reality.

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Lunch Break

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Lunch buffets can be found in Columbia Hall and the International Terrace. While this is a networking lunch break, please note, the annual Meeting of the Members will take place during the lunch hour in the International Ballroom.

Speaker(s): Eugene Cochrane, President, The Duke Endowment; Sherry Magill, President, Jessie Ball duPont Fund; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Diana Sieger, President, Grand Rapids Community Foundation (MI); Vikki Spruill, President & CEO, Council on Foundations

12:45 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.

CAF America: IRS Rules & Best Practices for International Grantmaking

Columbia Hall North, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Anacostia River/Chesapeake Bay Watershed Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

The Nation's Capital is divided into two separate but unequal parts by the beautiful but polluted Anacostia River and the 1200 acres of surrounding federal land. To the west are the grand monuments, most government buildings, the downtown, and several wealthy neighborhoods. To the east, some middle class neighborhoods are interspersed with areas of poverty, blight, and persistent social challenges. An ambitious plan to clean the river, promote sustainable economic development, and create a world-class riverside park was created more than a decade ago under then-Mayor Anthony Williams. Some very interesting elements have succeeded, including the world's first green professional sports stadium and a vibrant new riverside neighborhood, but others have been stalled. Participants will meet inside the Nationals Stadium to hear former Mayor Williams speak of the centrality of the area to the Nation's Capital vision and his ongoing efforts to transform it, then board two small boats to tour the river area.

Please note that the majority of this site session takes place on a boat, and there will be a 10 minute walk between sites. Please wear comfortable attire.

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

We as a nation should not just be preparing youth to succeed in competitive colleges, but to also empower them to be change agents in their communities and the larger society to create a more just, free, and equal world. The tour will take participants by bus to the Csar Chvez Public Charter Schools for Public Policy's facility near Howard University. The Chavez Schools started with a vision to prepare inner city students to pursue a college education and take an active role in addressing important social issues in their communities. The Schools started with 60 students in the basement of a Safeway and now serves 1,400 students in three campuses from grades 6 - 12. Join us for a tour to learn the incredible history of this program, and how the dual mission of college prep and public policy has prepared hundreds of students to be effective in the democratic process.

Session Materials :

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Crime - A Rupture of the Social Contract: Strategies to Reconnect the Mistrusting and Disconnected

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

Violence affects all aspects of life and results in considerable physical, emotional, social, and economic consequences. It is a serious public health problem that affects people in large cities, small towns, and rural areas across the United States. Organizations of various types (civic, governmental, nonprofit, advocacy) are seeking ways to participate meaningfully in reducing violence and fostering safe communities. The philanthropic sector has played a catalytic role in assisting local and national efforts, and it can play an essential role in helping to support and, in some cases, lead promising violence prevention efforts across the nation. This highly interactive session will explore violence prevention from various angles: creating law enforcement/citizen trust reconnecting kids to school improving outcomes for young men and boys of color forging community/city and county linkages and forging inter-agency linkages to reduce violence and build healthy communities.

Speaker(s): John Calhoun, Senior Consultant, National League of Cities; Charles Fields, Regional Program Manager, Los Angeles, The California Endowment; Jennifer Maconochie, Director, Strategic Initiatives & Policies, Boston Police Department; Georgina McDowell, Former Salinas, CA Community Safety Director, Community Alliance For Safety and Peace; Theron Pride, Senior Advisor, Department of Justice Programs, National Forum of Youth Violence Prevention; Barbara Raymond, Director, Schools & Neighborhoods, The California Endowment

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

DC Vote Bus Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

Americans living in our nation's capital, the epicenter of democracy, fulfill all of the obligations of citizenship pay full federal taxes, fight and die in wars, and serve on juries yet are still denied voting representation in the US Congress. This learning tour will take participants off the beaten path of the usual monuments and sites through several of the eight wards in Washington, DC. The tour will share the untold political story of the city including the role of the lack of voting rights in the disenfranchisement of residents for decades. Speakers will discuss various dynamics of a city with structural discrimination, disenfranchisement, and swiftly changing demographics of residents and the actual political system that negatively affects the lives of its residents. Attendees will also visit lesser known memorials in the city that are uniquely D.C. and learn of their significance in the daily lives of residents.

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Family Foundations in Practice: Choosing and Preparing Your Grantmaking Successors

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

One of the greatest sources of joy and opportunity, anxiety, and frustration for philanthropic families may be the transfer of wealth, responsibility, and values from one generation to the next. This interactive session will delve into the particular challenges and best practices for succession in family foundation governance. Through a case study and small group discussion, participants will learn about generational succession that honors a donor's legacy and reflects the family's values. The experience of the Clare family will serve as a framework for discussing:

  • Designing an effective governance structure
  • Selecting board members
  • Engaging the next generation
  • Adopting a collective mission and goals

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Mary Phillips, President, GMA Foundations; Kathy Whelpley, Executive Vice President, National Center for Family Philanthropy

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Philanthropy as Movement: Next Generation Philanthropic Leadership's Active Investment in Social Change

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

Have you ever met a young social entrepreneur or a young activist? You know the type, someone who obsesses about a particular cause or specific business model to address social and environmental issues. What happens when a young member of a big business family meets this person? Unite passion, discipline, and resources and you get a flame that inspires and can illuminate an entire sector. Come learn from members of Nexus, a global youth movement increase and improve philanthropy by uniting unlikely allies and democratizing philanthropic deliberation.

Speaker(s): Patrick Gage, Treasurer, The Curtis L. Carlson Family Foundation; Mary Galeti, Vice Chair, Tecovas Foundation; Jonah Wittkamper, Co-Founder & Global Director, Nexus Network

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Fostering Bipartisan Problem Solving

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

The political divide in Washington looks like it is here to stay, so those in the world of philanthropy must find ways to forge common ground and solve critical problems facing our country. Two leaders at the forefront of efforts to bring Republicans and Democrats together will discuss the opportunities and challenges for making government work. Jason Grumet is the President of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a think tank that actively promotes bipartisanship. BPC brings together experts and leaders from across the aisle to find bipartisan solutions to difficult problems. BPC recently created a national Commission on Political Reform to develop policy recommendations for reducing the impact of polarization. Nancy Jacobson is the co-founder of No Labels, a growing citizens' movement of Democrats, Republicans and Independents dedicated to promoting a new politics of problem solving. The organization has formed a coalition of more than 90 members of Congress who are committed to regular across-the-aisle meetings, embracing the new attitude of problem solving and being real leaders. The panel will be moderated by Joe Goldman, who leads the Democracy Fund, which supports BPC and No Labels as part of its initiative to reduce political gridlock and hyper-partisanship.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Joe Goldman, Director, Democracy Fund; Jason Grumet, Founder and President, Bipartisan Policy Center; Nancy Jacobson, Founder, No Labels

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Leveraging Community Knowledge in an Increasingly Connected World

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

Many community and place-based funders have been harnessing community knowledge to further their respective missions. Not surprisingly, foundations initially focus on the details of collecting data and creating reports the how' and the what' and the when.' But those initial forays quickly expanded into much larger conversations about mobilizing community knowledge. And these conversations raised important questions: Why is knowledge important to our communities? What role does it play? How can it enrich our lives and our vision of the future?

Speaker(s): Michael Batchelor, President, The Erie Community Foundation; Bahia Ramos Synnott, Program Director, Community Foundations, John S. & James L. Knight Foundation; Lee Rose, Director, Community Foundations of Canada; Bina Venkataraman, Senior Advisor on Climate Change Innovation, The White House

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Multi-Sectoral Collaboration: A Recipe for Disasters...or Not?

Georgetown East, Concourse Level

Natural disasters affect millions of people globally every year. Trends indicate that natural disasters are becoming more frequent and destructive, impacting communities and economies globally. How we prepare for and respond to these events is becoming increasingly important. Philanthropy has a role to play not only in immediate relief and recovery, but also in mitigation, risk reduction and resilience building. The session will bring together experts from philanthropy, the private sector, and government to discuss with attendees how funders can work in multi-sectoral partnerships to more effectively mitigate the risks of disasters.

Speaker(s): Jainey Bavishi, Executive Director for APDR3, University of Hawaii Foundation; Irene Hirano, President, Chair of the Board of Trustees, Ford Foundation; Alfonso Martinez-Fonts, Executive Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation; Tony Pipa, Deputy Assistant Administrator, Foundation For Louisiana

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Re-committing to Rural America: The Expanding Crisis of Rural Poverty and Its Effects

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

A rapid process of urbanization has intensified economic stresses in rural America. Fully a third of all non-urban counties in the U.S. now have childhood poverty rates of 30% and above. Philanthropic leaders have repeatedly tried to rally foundations around the development of a common agenda for addressing rural poverty, but the scale of the problem is growing faster than existing efforts.

This session will begin with a presentation on existing challenges facing rural America, including a special emphasis on economic trends and the causes of poverty. Foundation leaders will talk about strategic efforts they've undertaken to address poverty and economic development challenges in the communities they serve. The leading rural development expert at the U.S. Department of Agriculture will also discuss government efforts to work with philanthropy to address rural housing, business, and utilities development challenges.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Tracey Dorsett, Program Officer, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; Charles Fluharty, President and CEO, Rural Policy Research Institute; Doug O'Brien, Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); Carla Roberts, President and CEO, Fremont Area Community Foundation (MI); Kevin Walker, President and CEO, Northwest Area Foundation

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Retrofitting Movements: A Pioneer’s Guide to Advancing Advocacy in a Networked World

Monroe, Concourse Level

In a world being dramatically reshaped by the power of networks and technology, how can philanthropy support nonprofit leaders on the front lines of social advocacy especially as they run organizations and movements founded well before the advent of the internet? What does this look like in the real world?

In this interactive session, learn how funders can partner with pioneering nonprofit leaders in this case, an 80 year-old civil rights bellwether addressing immigration and criminal justice - to embrace technology and breakthrough forms of collaboration.

Our panelists will share their perspectives on what it means for philanthropy to take risks on &ldquouncredentialed&rdquo approaches to advance justice in response to a rapidly changing landscape. Explore how this approach is making waves nationally and how established and emerging movements are reenergizing by using new pathways to advance equality and inclusion. 

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Heather Grant, Consultant, Levi Strauss Foundation; Daniel Lee, Executive Director, Levi Strauss Foundation; Abdi Soltani, Executive Director, ACLU of Northern California

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

What’s Your Encore? Producing Talent Windfalls to Solve Society’s Challenges

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

Millions are already in the midst of inventing a new stage of life and work the encore years between the end of midlife and anything resembling old-fashioned retirement. Envision this chapter as a time when you make some of your most important contributions, for ourselves, for our world, for the well-being of future generations. Inventing a new stage of life is an ambitious undertaking, one of the great social innovation projects of the 21st century. Yet this aspiration will be as much about small changes as big ones. If you share the dream of supporting efforts to produce, together, a windfall of talent to help solve society's greatest challenges, from education to the environment, health care to poverty then join this session featuring the founder of visionary leader behind Encore Careers. Thanks to the experience dividend now being realized around the world, we have the time and energy to live a legacy, instead of just leaving one. So what are you going to do for your encore?

Speaker(s): Marc Freedman, Founder/CEO, Civic Ventures; Lester Strong, Chief Executive Officer, AARP Experience Corps, AARP

2:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

NGOsource: The Centralized Equivalency Determination Repository

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

President Obama’s Social Innovation Fund at Five… Where it’s been, and where it’s going

Gunston, Terrace Level

Please join Social Innovation Fund director (and former foundation executive) Michael Smith for an intimate discussion on one of the president's key philanthropic partnerships aimed at growing effective solutions. The Social Innovation Fund was established in 2009 with a simple goal find solutions that work and make them work for more people. Since that time, SIF has partnered with 20 grantmaking institutions to provide over a half billion dollars in public and private funds to more than 200 innovative, evidence-based non-profits working to transform low income communities. The SIF will announce the results of its largest funding competition this fall, including a new Pay for Success pilot grant program that will be announced later this month. Come share your thoughts with Michael and hear what's working, what needs to be improved, what your colleagues are learning at the forefront of federal partnerships and scaling solutions that work.

Read an update on the Social Innovation Fund: Innovation to Impact: Obama's Social Innovation Fund at Four - Stanford Social Innovation Review.

Speaker(s): Michael Smith, Director, Social Innovation Fund, Corporation for National and Community Service

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Kaiser Permanente: Community Approaches and Electronic Data Collections

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Blue-Sky Discussion: Joining Forces to Achieve Community Resilience

Columbia 11 & 12, Terrace Level

Imagine what it would be like if the planets aligned perfectly! This is the session to make that happenon the issue of climate resilience. Join this ideation seminar to help shape possible collaborations between foundations and federal agencies to improve public climate literacy and community resilience in the face of global environmental change. The recent release of the National Climate Assessment, the Climate Data Initiative, and the recent IPCC report indicate the time is right for an all hands on deck response to the challenges communities will continue to face as the climate changes

Be part of a what-if conference table with policy and science officials from the US Global Change Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, and White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Council on Environmental Quality. Questions for exploration: Should the government catalyze larger scale efforts through connection points between federal agencies and philanthropic organizations? What cross sector investments should be leveraged to advance climate literacy and resilience? How could foundations help federal agencies understand what communities need to know about climate change impacts? Would foundations be interested in participating on a federal climate resiliency partnerships working group? At least one follow-up action will be identified.
Moderator: Sarah E. Schoedinger, M.S, Senior Program Manager, US Dept of Commerce, Office of Education, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Speaker(s): Lin Chambers, Project Scientist, NASA; Jill Karsten, Program Director, GEO Education and Diversity, National Science Foundation

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Crowd Noise: The Millennial Generation and Strategic Philanthropy

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

Millennials are fueling the growth of innovative approaches such as crowdfunding, microlending, and mobile giving often choosing tools that allow them to direct their philanthropy at small-scale projects and causes that provide tangible results. But as this massive generation matures and builds wealth, will it continue to favor giving that provides instant gratification? If so, will philanthropy be reduced to attempts to address small-scale symptoms of problems rather than efforts to attack the root causes of these problems?

Join us for a thought-provoking discussion that will explore the giving habits of the millennial generation and discuss how these habits will affect philanthropy in the coming decades. Will this generation - often lauded for its philanthropic spirit - live up to its promise and develop innovative results to long-held problems? Can millennial-favored giving vehicles evolve into tools that help philanthropy become more strategic? Or will small-scale giving become the new norm?

Speaker(s): Derrick Feldman, President, Achieve; Peter Panepento, Vice President, Network, Council on Foundations; Katherina Rosqueta, Founding Executive Director of The Center for High Impact Philanthropy, University of Pennsylvania

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Catalyzing Change in Your Community

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

It's often said that foundations don't have the resources to tackle big problems in our society. Yet foundations are perfectly positioned to be catalysts for change on complex issues, especially in their communities. This program for family foundations as well as non-family funders, spotlights the unique powers, position, and non-dollar assets that foundations leverage to make outsized impact on important, urgent issues. We'll explore essential strategies such as taking the time to understand the issue and building knowledge, using the knowledge to identify gaps and points of leverage, engaging, mobilizing, and connecting partners, working longer-term, taking higher risks, raising public awareness, and often-seeking to influence policy. The session will emphasize ways to get started. Discover how to use your unique assets and position as a funder to be a force for change

Speaker(s): Andy Carroll, Senior Program Manager, Exponent Philanthropy; Janis Reischmann, Executive Director, Hau'oli Mau Loa Foundation; Martha Toll, Executive Director, Butler Family Fund

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Philanthropy as Personal Expression: Solutions, Values or Ideologies

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

As the range of giving vehicles and kinds of donors has expanded dramatically in recent years, philanthropy has increasingly become an outlet for promulgating an agenda or personal belief system instead of trying to solve a problem or issue. From the Koch brothers to George Soros, today's "philanthactivists" use a wide array of strategies to advance their values - such as political contributions and investing - in addition to their charitable contributions. Additionally, major contributions from individuals are all receiving far greater scrutiny in order to interpret personal agendas or ideology. This session will explore how contemporary donors are expressing and acting on their values through their giving, and the implications this has on grantees.

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Moving Against the Tide, Until You Turn It: A Historic Year for LGBTQ Equality

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

The movements for LGBTQ equality and advancement have created a fundamental shift in thinking and social attitudes in a remarkably short period of time. Many high-profile successes in 2013 have secured a place in history for one of the country's most notable and effective civil rights efforts. This important moment provides an opportunity to reflect on the role that organized philanthropy has played in fostering efforts to advance LGBTQ people and their allies.

This session will open with a presentation on current levels of philanthropic funding for LGBTQ related issues. Leading national figures will then discuss various aspects of how certain groups built support for important issues, like the freedom to marry, broader understandings of gender, and corporate philanthropy.

Speaker(s): Deena Fidas, Director, Workplace Project, Human Rights Campaign; Kevin Jennings, Executive Director, Arcus Foundation; Ben Maulbeck, President, Funders for LGBTQ Issues; Evan Wolfson, Founder and President, Freedom To Marry

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Re-Emerging Art of Funding Innovation

Georgetown East, Concourse Level

"Innovation" is everywhere you look. The term is used so widely and so vaguely that it's come to mean almost anything, or, worse - nothing at all. But innovation has been an essential part of philanthropy from long before it became a buzzword. The field has a rich history of private funders using their resources to seed experiments with the potential to produce outsized social returns. Building on the Monitor Institute's recent cover story in the spring issue of Stanford Social Innovation Review, this interactive session aims to introduce participants to the core concepts of innovation funding and to help them understand how the processes for intentionally funding innovation differ from those of more traditional grantmaking approaches.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Gabriel Kasper, Senior Manager, Monitor Institute; Sarah Koch, Director, Social Innovation, The Case Foundation; Justin Marcoux, Manager, Monitor Institute

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Taking Impact Investing to the Next Level: From Your Foundation to the Global Stage

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

Many foundations and individuals believe in the power of making investments that seek a social and financial return. The global conversation on impact investing, a tool that complements charitable giving, entered the center-stage last summer when a G8 task force formed to develop a policy framework that would accelerate impact investing, establish a global approach to measure social outcomes, and encourage greater engagement across foundations, institutions and private investors. This session will provide an overview of the range of strategies through which foundations of all sizes can make impact investments, and offer an opportunity to discuss impact investing policy. Session participants will learn about various policy approaches, share reactions to them, and discuss how foundations can move impact investing forward.

Speaker(s): Kate Ahern, Vice President, Social Innovation, The Case Foundation; Melanie Audette, Deputy Director, Mission Investors Exchange; Peter Berliner, Managing Director, Mission Investors Exchange; Peter Berliner, Managing Director, Philanthropy Northwest; Katie Grace, Program Manager, Initiative for Responsible Investment, Harvard Kennedy School; Rosita Najmi, Associate, Knowledge & Advocacy, Omidyar Network Fund, Inc.; Laura Tomasko, Network Developer, Council on Foundations; Lisa Woll, CEO, US SIF

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

The Role of Religions in an Increasingly Polarized Society

Monroe, Concourse Level

What is the role of religion in an increasingly polarized society? What should it be? What can religious/spiritual groups do to bring about harmony in a polarized society? Examine these and similar questions while learning about examples of religious efforts to mitigate the polarization.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Michael Balinsky, Executive Vice President, Chicago Board of Rabbis; Janaan Hashim, Trustee, Council For A Parliament of the World's Religions; Malik Mujahid, Chair, Council For A Parliament of the World's Religions; Mary Nelson, Executive Director, Council For A Parliament of the World's Religions; Cheryl Tupper, Vice President for Religion and Healthcare, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

What is Philanthropy's Role in Supporting or Building Movements?

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

All federal civil rights legislation is the result of social movements. This session contends that social movements, local and otherwise, are just as important now to the philanthropic sector as they were in the history of this country's efforts to bring democracy to everyone.

Speaker(s): Alexandra Delvalle, Program Director, Third Wave Foundation; Shawn Dove, Campaign Manager, Open Society Foundations; Cristina Jimenez, Co-Founder & Managing Director, United We Dream; Sally Kohn, Director, Movement Vision Lab, Center for Community Change; Saket Soni, Executive Director, New Orleans Workers' Center For Racial Justice; Luz Vega-Marquis, President & CEO, Marguerite Casey Foundation

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Why Strategic Communications Matters for the Causes We Care About

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

The philanthropy sector tackles some of the biggest problems of our day, like climate change, education and health care reform, and the provision of vital services for those in need. In our field, there's a growing realization that part of the change foundations support involves the intelligent use of communications strategies and tactics.

Foundations need to think about communications both in terms of their own organizational voices and brands as well as the grantmaking strategies they develop and execute.

In this session, some of the field's leading communications professionals will share some of the latest and best trends in strategic communications. They will emphasize recent research to gather evidence on what constitutes effective communications for social change and impact. They will also talk about how communications partnerships with nonprofits are increasingly important for successful communication.

Speaker(s): Rebecca Arno, Vice President of Communications, The Denver Foundation; David Brotherton, President, Brotherton Strategies; Alfred Ironside, Director of Communications, Ford Foundation; Minna Jung, Communications Director, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation; Joanne Krell, Vice President for Communications, W.K. Kellogg Foundation

3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Stategic Research on the Foundation Sector

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Happy Hour in Council Central

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Reception Row!

This "buffet-style" networking event offers a series of simultaneous receptions. Join conversations related to the issues closest to you and build new relationships. Visit one or all of them:

  • EPIP Oaklawn Room
  • CAF America Jay Room
  • Public Interest Projects Morgan Room
  • Family Philanthropy Kalorama Room
  • California-Arizona-Nevada Network Holmead Rooml
  • New England Network Independence Room,
  • Communications Network L'Enfant Room
  • Exponent Philanthorpy Northwest Room

All Reception Row events are located in the Heights Meeting Rooms on the Lobby Level.

10:30 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

President Obama’s Social Innovation Fund at Five… Where it’s been, and where it’s going

Gunston, Terrace Level

Please join Social Innovation Fund director (and former foundation executive) Michael Smith for an intimate discussion on one of the president's key philanthropic partnerships aimed at growing effective solutions. The Social Innovation Fund was established in 2009 with a simple goal find solutions that work and make them work for more people. Since that time, SIF has partnered with 20 grantmaking institutions to provide over a half billion dollars in public and private funds to more than 200 innovative, evidence-based non-profits working to transform low income communities. The SIF will announce the results of its largest funding competition this fall, including a new Pay for Success pilot grant program that will be announced later this month. Come share your thoughts with Michael and hear what's working, what needs to be improved, what your colleagues are learning at the forefront of federal partnerships and scaling solutions that work.

Read an update on the Social Innovation Fund: Innovation to Impact: Obama's Social Innovation Fund at Four - Stanford Social Innovation Review.

Speaker(s): Michael Smith, Director, Social Innovation Fund, Corporation for National and Community Service

Tuesday, June 10

7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Breakfast Plenary: Bringing the Nation Together: Building a Community of Support for Veterans and their Families

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

Foundations are well positioned to respond to the needs of a new generation of American military veterans. Funders are joining public sector and business partners all over the nation to help veterans and military families make a successful transition back into their communities. The time is right to harness our great American community spirit toward a more comprehensive, holistic welcome back to America's all-volunteer force who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, including our neighbors in the National Guard and the Reserves.

Meet and greet delegations of veterans and spouses from the Blue Star Families, the Military Spouse JD Career Network, and Hope for the Warriors who will be attending the breakfast as guests of the Council. Plenary speakers will highlight the critical role foundations and non-profits play in creating welcoming communities for these families as they return to civilian life. A roundtable discussion with funders of the Joining Forces Impact Pledge, veterans, and civic engagement leaders will interact with the audience who will be invited to tweet their ideas about community engagement opportunities and philanthropic leadership roles.

Let us lead our communities toward the partnerships needed to insure there are no closed doors to those who have served our nation during a time of war.

Speaker(s): Melissa Beach, Director, Training & Services, San Antonio Area Foundation; Catharine Grimes, Director, corporate Philanthropy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc.; Miguel Howe, Director, Military Service Initiative, George W. Bush Institute; James Isenhower, Director of Warrior and Family Support, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Peter Long, President and CEO, Blue Shield of California Foundation; Vikki Spruill, President & CEO, Council on Foundations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

All Together Now: Collaborative Approaches to Learning and Evaluation

Monroe, Concourse Level

Evaluation can be a powerful tool to help improve the results of our work and prevent us from repeating mistakes. But who benefits most from the field's eagerness to know what works? Is it the grantmaker or the grantee delivering programs and services? Has evaluation and learning inadvertently become too foundation-centric? By designing and implementing evaluations in a more collaboratively way, grantmakers can create powerful and valuable mechanisms for real-time improvement for both themselves and their grantees. Learn from grantmakers who take an engaged approach to learning and evaluation, support peer learning, and take the time to reflect on both successes and failures. Explore how these practices can bring a more collaborative focus and build grantee and community capacity for this work.

Speaker(s): Allison Barmann, Strategy and Learning Vice President, The Bush Foundation; Dena Jackson, VP - Grants and Research, Dallas Women's Foundation; Heather Peeler, Vice President of Member & Partner Engagement, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Building Financial Security For Women Over a Lifetime: A Focus on Family Economic Empowerment

Georgetown East, Concourse Level

Poverty alleviation efforts require us to think about how each member of a family unit is impacted by social and economic forces. As we gain perspective on the individual family members, we better understand how to design and fund programs that build community while addressing specific social issues. Though this seems clear, grantmaking sometimes has the unintended consequence of creating fractures in society by deciding to direct funding toward one group over another. This session will discuss how understanding each member of the family unit is important as we design and implement programs tailored to specific family members such as women and girls.

Today, more women and girls are living healthier lives than ever. Concerted partnerships between governments, business, health professionals, and the media have led to an unprecedented expansion of interventions for girls at the most critical stages in their lives, so significant gains have been made in women's economic empowerment.

But too many women face significant economic challenges, especially because of inequalities in the workplace. Women earn less money than men, face hiring discrimination, work in less profitable industries, and must confront social expectations that often limit their time and choices. Because women live longer than men, the impact of these disparities gets magnified over the span of their lives.

By exploring social fracture through the lens of gender, this session will focus on philanthropy's ability to enhance women's financial security. The session will begin with an introduction to how gender impacts the economic lives of both women and men. Panelists will then look at efforts to increase the economic security of low-wage women, address philanthropic priorities, and examine strategies for improving the long-term financial security of working women. The purpose of the session is to discuss philanthropy's role in poverty alleviation through women and the transfer of wealth.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Stephanie Bell-Rose, Senior Managing Director and Head of the TIAA-CREF Institute, TIAA-CREF Institute; Kilolo Kijakazi, Program Officer, Ford Foundation; Jen Klein, Senior Policy Advisor, No Ceilings Project, Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation; Riki Wilchins, Executive Director, TrueChild

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Considering a Perpetuity or Spend Down Strategy?

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

Practicing effective philanthropy brings enormous benefits to the communities your foundation serves. But what does it mean to practice effective philanthropy? Some argue that establishing a foundation with the intention of spending the foundation's resources in a specific period of time creates a helpful urgency in efforts to fulfill your mission. Others say that establishing a foundation to exist in perpetuity is the best way to achieve your goals. Participants will have a chance to listen and participate in a discussion with two leaders who lead a foundation that use one of these strategies. Listen to these leaders share their thoughts, and then join in a discussion with your foundation peers about the best way forward.

Speaker(s): John Rohe, Vice President of Philanthropy, Colcom Foundation; Jeffrey Solomon, President, Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies, Inc.; Kathleen Starr, Vice President of Capital Deployment, The F.B. Heron Foundation; Laura Tomasko, Network Developer, Council on Foundations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Family Philanthropy - It's All About Relationships: Engaging Difference in the Philanthropic Community

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

Our country and our world are deeply divided. Too many people have lost the capacity or the will to listen thoughtfully, to talk respectfully, and to relate constructively. Naturally, many organizations seek to alleviate our many challenges through attention to the issue. This model, though almost universal, is flawed. An alternative and growing method, that has a substantive and credible history in both democratic practice and statecraft, is the Relationship Paradigm, born out of the Sustained Dialogue Movement, which defines dialogue as listening deeply enough to another to be changed by what you hear. It promotes one central idea: that however seemingly insurmountable the presenting challenge, that the problem is almost always the failure of relationships.

Intentional and prolonged attention to relationships will resolve challenges. The Paradigm is rooted in what was used to negotiate the Camp David Peace Accords and Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty, and has grown into a leading effort to address race, gender, and diversity questions on 30 college campuses, to address democratic conflict on Capitol Hill, and to enhance employee engagement in workplaces.

During this session, participants will practice applying the Five Elements of Relationship to a real-time challenge in the sector and take this tool with them into their professional lives. Explore identity, interests, power, perceptions, and patterns of interaction. Participants will trace the history of the movement that is bringing a new transformational and practical alternative to conflict resolution in democratic practice and current social challenges domestically and around the world.

Speaker(s): Amy Lazarus, Executive Director, Sustained Dialogue Institute

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Family Philanthropy - Leading Through Change: Advice from Seasoned Family Foundation CEOs

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

Using findings from the just-released NCFP publication, Leading through Change: Advice From and for Seasoned CEOs, the session will offer insights into how family foundation CEOs have forged long-term, successful careers in challenging positions. The session, designed for both CEOs and their boards, will address the life cycles most long-time family foundations go through, such as a shift to a new generation, the death of the donor or board leader, large fluctuations of assets, changing grantmaking priorities, and changing community needs. Three veteran CEOs will share the ways they have led through these transitions, and audience members will be invited to raise additional issues from their own experiences.

Speaker(s): Peter Bird, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Frist Foundation; Christine Elbel, Executive Director, Fleishhacker Foundation; Susan Price, Vice President, National Center for Family Philanthropy; Martha Toll, Executive Director, Butler Family Fund

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Federalism 2.0 Means Doing it Outside of the Beltway

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

In an environment of a polarized, partisan Congress and a fractured relationship between the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, this session will argue that these circumstances present a set of drivers that are changing the roles of federal, state and local governments. Many State and local leaders are expressing concern about growing social and economic inequality and its consequences for economies, citizen engagement, political participation, non-profit delivery systems, and schools.

Our guest speakers will discuss the trends emerging in American governance as a result of to sustained inaction at the national level to address critical economic issues and growing social problems. What role will foundations and the community leadership groups they fund play in this new concept of federalism?

In the absence of federal leadership, is it a silver lining that state and local governments will lead of the nation's social innovations for the foreseeable future?

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Jennifer Bradley, Fellow and Senior Advisor, Metropolitan Policy Program, The Brookings Institution; Dan Carol, Board Member, Office of Governor John Kitzhaber; Mike Green, Co-founder, Executive Director, ScaleUp America; Stephanie Powers, Sr. Director for Policy and Partnerships, Council on Foundations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Fostering Philanthropy and Civil Society Globally

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

Philanthropy and civil society thrive in many parts of the world, providing hope and opportunity for millions. However, in some places, constraints on civil society and philanthropy are growing, thus restricting freedoms of association and assistance. Funders and government leaders must work more collaboratively to oppose these limitations and create a more enabling environment that assists our global neighbors in need. The Council on Foundations and the International Center for Non-Profit Law, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State, launched the Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society's Global Philanthropy Working Group in 2012. The Dialogue operates through working groups co-chaired by civil society representatives and senior U.S. Government officials. It is focused on topics including religion, foreign policy, women's empowerment, and labor, and allows the Department to work with a wide range of non-state actors in the U.S. and worldwide to channel recommendations into policy outcomes.

Join Dr. Tomicah Tillemann, the State Department's Senior Advisor for Civil Society and Emerging Democracies, Nicole Campbell, Deputy General Counsel, Open Society Foundations and Douglas Rutzen, President and CEO, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law for an interactive audience discussion about how through this innovative public-private partnership, philanthropy and government are working together to protect and support a thriving civic ecosystem worldwide. During the session, the discussants will seek audience responses to questions. We encourage you review these questions and come prepared to offer insight that will inform the working group's efforts on behalf of philanthropy and civil society in the coming year.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): A. Campbell, Deputy General Counsel, Open Society Foundations; Douglas Rutzen, President, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law; Tomicah Tillemann, Senior Advisor to the Secretary of State for Civil Society &Emerging Democracies, U.S. State Department

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Growing to Scale: Using a Digital Platform for Youth Civic Participation

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

It's the Community, Stupid. Not the Government!

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

Session attendees will leave with a better understanding of the importance of developing a well-coordinated community response when veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan leave active military life to return to civilian lives. Veterans and military families will share the challenges they often meet when they return from war zones or arrive in new communities after transition. Getting lost in the maze of civilian life after years of regimented, highly structured lives in the military is not an unusual phenomenon. That first point of contact" can make a difference - between a successful integration or a spiral toward isolation, frustration, and fear about the future. Foundations working with partners to develop soft landing strategies, such as faith-based organizations and veterans service organizations, will share how they are helping veterans open new life chapters after their service to the nation.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Melissa Beach, Director, Training & Services, San Antonio Area Foundation; Donald Cooke, Senior Vice President of Philanthropy, McCormick Foundation; Patricia Haley, Mission Continues Fellow, Volunteers of America - Headquarters; Betsy Schwartz, Vice President for Public Education and Strategic Initiatives, National Council For Community Behavioral Healthcare

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Mastering Key Elements of 21st Century Talent Management

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

Is your foundation attracting, retaining, and inspiring the very best performance from your staff? In this session, you will learn about proven strategies in recruiting, onboarding, and developing an inclusive leadership pipeline. Participants will engage in a dynamic and pragmatic interactive discussion about strategies for attracting and nurturing the very best people needed to tackle the difficult challenges facing philanthropy in the 21st Century. You will leave this session with fresh ideas, colleague connections and practical tools you can begin implementing right away.

Speaker(s): Samantha Gilbert, Vice President of Talent and Human Resources, Ford Foundation; Dianna Langenburg, Director of Human Resources and Organizational Services, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Jean McCall, Director of Human Resources, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; Pratichi Shah, President and CEO, Flourish Talent Management Solutions, LLC

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

The Power of Place: Social Change in the Second Century of Community Philanthropy

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

Many foundations, including community foundations, are committed to place. Their work and approach connects their mission to local needs, opportunities, leadership, and values. While resources may vary, all place-based philanthropic institutions are leveraging complete capital and local assets to affect social change. This workshop will explore how to partner with foundations and other stakeholders in this work.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Matthew Bogoshian, Senior Policy Counsel, Environmental Protection Agency; Sheri Brady, Director of Policy, The Aspen Institute; Tamara Copeland, President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers; Nike Irvin, Vice President, Programs, California Community Foundation

10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Closing Plenary: Finding Common Ground to Advance the Common Good

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

Based on their successful USA Today column "Common Ground," political speakers Bob Beckel (a liberal Democratic strategist) and Cal Thomas (a conservative columnist) take on the most controversial issues of the day. Whether it's the Tea Party, unions, health care, or regulatory issues, Beckel and Thomas cut through the bickering and get to the heart of what really matters.

Departing from the archaic crossfire format, Beckel and Thomas find shared beliefs that both liberals and conservatives can agree upon. More like a conversation between friends than debate between enemies, they inspire audiences to find common ground in their own beliefs and to put aside politics as usual. Their book, Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America, expands on their writing in USA Today and is a discussion of how liberals and conservatives can work together to put America back on track.

12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Corporate Post-Conference Program - Corporate Philanthropy's Next Chapter - Issues Focus Groups

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

Now that you've attended the conference and heard from the experts, join corporate philanthropy peers and colleagues to chart the next chapter for corporate philanthropy. Lend your expertise to explore opportunities and chart the course for cross-sector, cross-constituency thought partnerships and to advance issues of specific concern for the corporate sector and the philanthropic field.

Speaker(s): Jennifer Chavez Rubio, Director, Gifts & Grants Management, Strategic Partnerships, United States Peace Corps; Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation; Caroline Mahfood, Executive Director, GraceKennedy Foundation

Wednesday, December 31

8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Energizing Private Partnerships at the Federal Level

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

The session will examine the variety of efforts by the federal government to accelerate partnerships with foundations and corporations across a diverse set of agencies and departments. In particular, it will look at the ways in which federal agencies and their leaders are creating mechanisms that will catalyze cross-sectoral collaboration, their roles and responsibilities, the conditions that increase the probability of success, and lessons learned to date. Findings from a recent study conducted by The Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy at the University of Southern California will be discussed and implications for practice will be explored.

If you wish to attend you must RSVP to Nicholas Williams, Nicholas.Williamsprice.usc.edu

Speaker(s): James Ferris, Director, The Center on Philanthropy & Public Policy

1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Essential Skills and Strategies Course

Kalorama, Lobby Level

Essential Skills & Strategies (ESS) for New Grantmakers is a comprehensive educational program. For new grantmakers, the course will help to familiarize participants with the foundation world and the field of philanthropy. For seasoned grantmakers, it will act as a refresher. Designed by experts in the philanthropic sector, ESS is the field's standardized orientation for grantmakers. The sessions are designed to provide grantmakers with the knowledge, insight, skills, and tools to be effective in their work.

Speaker(s): Satonya Fair, Director, Grants Management, The Annie E. Casey Foundation; Lori Fuller, Director, Evaluation and Research, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust; Colburn Wilbur, Trustee, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Essential Skills and Strategies Course - Day 2

Kalorama, Lobby Level

Essential Skills & Strategies (ESS) for New Grantmakers is a comprehensive educational program. For new grantmakers, the course will help to familiarize participants with the foundation world and the field of philanthropy. For seasoned grantmakers, it will act as a refresher. Designed by experts in the philanthropic sector, ESS is the field's standardized orientation for grantmakers. The sessions are designed to provide grantmakers with the knowledge, insight, skills, and tools to be effective in their work.

Speaker(s): Satonya Fair, Director, Grants Management, The Annie E. Casey Foundation; Lori Fuller, Director, Evaluation and Research, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust; Colburn Wilbur, Trustee, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Public Policy Seminar

We've designed this seminar for our members and colleagues who work in policy and advocacy. This intensive one-day workshop will dive into the art of developing an effective strategy to address complex, multi-issue legislation. We will use Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp's Tax Reform Act of 2014 as our launching off point for the discussion.

Space for this event is limited. For more information or to express your interest in participating, please contact govtcof.org.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Lisa Danielson, Senior Project Manager, Gogerty Marriott; Matthew Dolan, Director, The Federal Policy Group; Gloria Johnson-Cusack, Executive Director, Leadership 18; Abby Levine, Legal Director, Bolder Advocacy, Alliance for Justice; Cindy Lott, Senior Counsel, Columbia Law School National State Attorneys General Program; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Gina Russo, , Gogerty Marriott; Sue Santa, Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Legal Affairs, Council on Foundations; Sean Walsh, Public Relations, Carl S. Mink, CPA P.A.; Steven Woolf, Tax Counsel, United Jewish Communities

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

CEO/Board Retreat

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

This one-day gathering is designed to give foundation CEOs and board members an opportunity to engage with their peers in thoughtful, candid, and off-the-record conversations. Conversation topics will touch on the current and complex issues facing philanthropy, as well as the burning challenges that keep you - a foundation leader - up at night. Participants will establish new relationships, reconnect with peers, and broaden their network of colleagues in the field.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Thaler Pekar, CEO, Thaler Pekar and Partners LLC; Marta Siberio, President, Marta Siberio Consulting

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Women, Leadership, and Social Change

Monroe, Concourse Level

Today&rsquos leaders in the business and social change sectors must address difficult challenges in their own lives, in their organizations, and in their communities. Research shows that while women possess the talents and skills needed to successfully tackle these complex problems, their assets are often overlooked and undervalued. Women Transforming Leadership (WTL) offers an energizing and holistic leadership session that will help women leaders in philanthropy discover and enhance their natural abilities to create and advance social change. This session is modeled on the successful program developed and offered by Oxford University&rsquos Said Business School. The session will also offer the opportunity to develop an active network for guidance and peer support with session leaders and other participants to reinforce best practices once back at the office.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation; Sujata Lamba, Director, FPD and Global Competitive Industries, The World Bank; Michele Ozumba, President and CEO, Women's Funding Network; Gayle Peterson, Senior Managing Director, Partners For Change; K. Sujata, President/CEO, Chicago Foundation For Women

6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Global Grantmaking Reception and Dinner

Reception: 6:30-7:30 Enjoy wine, hors d'oeuvres, and great conversation during this festive reception, with an opportunity to make connections with new colleagues.

Dinner: 7:30 - 9:00 With the resources of both governments and traditional philanthropy barely growing or in decline and the problems of poverty, ill-health, and environmental degradation ballooning daily, it is increasingly clear that new models for financing and promoting social and environmental objectives are urgently needed. Fortunately, a significant revolution appears to be underway on the frontiers of philanthropy and social investing that is providing at least a partial response to this dilemma. Salamon's talk, based on his new book Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing (April 2014, Oxford University Press) will discuss the new actors and new tools reshaping philanthropy and social investment, an analysis of the forces promoting these developments, and a discussion of how foundations are reshaping the way we support solutions to social and environmental problems throughout the world.

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Corporate Breakfast - Increasing Impact, Enhancing Value Corporate Philanthropy Trends Update

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

This networking breakfast - which is specifically designed for program and corporate giving officers and foundation leaders - offers an opportunity to review current and emerging trends in corporate philanthropy. In 2012, the Council launched Increasing Impact, Enhancing Value, a report on trends in corporate philanthropy. While you connect with peers, hear what has changed since the 2012 report and how the field is evolving.

Engage with your peers in a discussion on &ldquoBig Data&rdquo as a philanthropic trend. Explore and candidly discuss with experts how giving trends and the ethical use of &ldquoBig Data&rdquo present opportunities to create value and build societal trust for corporate philanthropy. Learn ways to avoid misuses of data that could lead to fracturing philanthropy and our society.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Jacob Gayle, Vice President, Medtronic Foundation and Medtronic Community Affairs, Medtronic Foundation; Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Opening Plenary: The State of the Nation: American History, Identity and Politics

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

According to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is comprised of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots. Learn how the battle lines of today's debates over social issues were shaped by our past and continue to mold our future. Examine the current state of opinions among the population and hear how the cultures of these distinct nations directly impact philanthropy as a field, our work in communities we serve, and the greater good.

Speaker(s): Jim Clifton, CEO, The Gallup Organization; Carly Hare, Executive Director , Native Americans in Philanthropy; Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation; Carol Larson, President and CEO, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Colin Woodard, , Award-Winning Author & Journalist

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Roundtable Discussion with the Department of Agriculture

Independence, Lobby Level

Our nation's U.S. Department of Agriculture and its significant resources impact most sectors of American life in cities and small towns, whether it is the food we eat, the energy we consume, the water we drink, the homes we build, or the places we recreate. The Department is exploring ways to collaborate more effectively with funders, so that its significant financial investments can be deployed to maximum impact. Please join us for an informal discussion about issues of interest to you and explore how this large federal agency could collaborate in your field. Topics could include: local food systems, child nutrition, land and water conservation, climate strategies, renewable energy, economic research, rural and tribal economic development, social equity in rural communities.

We will be joined by Chris Beck, Senior Projects Advisor at USDA.

12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Luncheon Plenary: Examining the State of Philanthropy

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

Part I Experiencing Life in a Polarized and Fractured Society

This two-part plenary session will continue the discussion started in the opening plenary session but from a different perspective. Gwen Ifill, journalist, author and managing editor of The PBS Newshour will moderate a conversation with students of The News Literacy Project - Carlos McKnight, Stewart Gray, Nabani Ashraf, Margaret Sella, Yashodhar Govil and Angie Ames - a national educational program that mobilizes seasoned journalists to work with educators to teach students to sort fact from fiction, on how they experience life in an increasingly polarized and fractured society.

Part II - Examining the State of Philanthropy

What is the State of Philanthropy in 2014? What can we expect in the next 10 years? Or in the next 50?

Philanthropy has been credited for blazing the trail on any number of social issues, from school reform, building hospitals and schools, as well as advancing medical research. Often, we tell these tales of success from a historical perspective looking back on the accomplishments.

But what about today and the years ahead? Philanthropy is in a state of evolution that must keep pace with the frenetic world around us. With a panel of leaders from a cross-section of philanthropic organizations, explore how we are reshaping, reimagining, and reframing the way we advance our missions while keeping true to the strong traditions, legacies, and values that have made American philanthropy a keystone for the world. We'll navigate the accomplishments, challenges, advances, and failures, as well as the issues on our minds today as we look to the future.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Mary Galeti, Vice Chair, Tecovas Foundation; Jonathan Greenblatt, Director, White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation, The White House; Gwen Ifill, Journalist, Managing Editor, Managing Editor, "The PBS Newshour"; Sherry Magill, President, Jessie Ball duPont Fund; Stacy Palmer, Editor, Chronicle of Philanthropy; Vikki Spruill, President & CEO, Council on Foundations; Steven Teles, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

2:40 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.

Philanthropic, Federal and Tribal Partnerships for Recovery of the Santa Clara Canyon and Ancient Tribal Lands

Piscataway, Lobby Level

Hosted by: Stephanie Powers, Federal Executive Branch Liaison, Council on Foundations

  • Guests: Carly Hare CEO, Native Americans in Philanthropy
  • Denise Morgan Gilliam Federal Emergency Management Agency, Recovery Division Director
Here is the story

The Khap'on Towa - the indigenous people of Santa Clara Pueblo, NM - are engaged in a monumental effort to restore their once-verdant Santa Clara Canyon and revitalize their ancient land-based culture in the aftermath of the cataclysmic Las Conchas wildfire. This fire was the most destructive of four catastrophic fires over 13 years that altogether have charred 80% of their watershed.

Instead of succumbing to hopelessness, Santa Clara Pueblo has decided that with every slope stabilized, every seedling planted, every habitat restored - the restoration of their beloved Canyon will mark the revival and rebirth of their ancient culture. While some may feel powerless to affect the global decline in cultural diversity and the devastation of climate change, in Khap'o Owingeh there is an opportunity to make a profound difference in sustaining the unique Tewa language and way of life by ensuring the future safety of their community, by restoring their canyon and protecting the last remaining forests in their ancestral homeland.

Come and learn more about the diverse and growing group of federal, state and non-profit partners coming together with the Pueblo's civic leadership to support an unprecedented, ambitious, multi-generational initiative. Receive a special invitation from the Governor of the Santa Clara Pueblo, J. Michael Chavarria to be a guest for their traditional Feast Day on August 12, 2014 and to join a national roundtable on Philanthropic, Federal and Tribal Partnerships for Disaster Recovery, including a tour of the canyon and the impacted lands. The New Mexico Community Foundation and the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Disaster Recovery Office are co-sponsoring the convening.

An important endeavor because

The people of Khap'o Owingeh have called the Jemez Mountains, Pajarito Plateau and Rio Grande Valley home for millennia. They are among only 6,000 people on Earth who sustain the Tewa language and culture. Their way of life is deeply interwoven with the Santa Clara Canyon the small stream it feeds has quenched their thirst and irrigated their farmlands, the elk and deer it nurtures have provided them with food, the plants and trees that climb its steep slopes yielded healing medicines and the heat for homes, and its sacred sites and ancient villages connect them with their ancestors. They cannot be who they are without their land.

The forces of climate change did not begin with Santa Clara and they cannot confront its impact alone. It will take an innovative partnership with federal and state agencies, conservation organizations and foundations to protect Santa Clara's community, restore their lands and help sustain their culture.

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Afternoon Plenary: Inequality, A Polarized Society, and Young Men of Color

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

On the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, efforts by institutional philanthropy to advance positive social change continue to require the confrontation of barriers and hard truths about inequality. Invoke the matter of race, and philanthropy finds itself navigating difficult waters, and particularly so in the context of a deeply polarized political landscape in our nation.

This two-part session begins with a keynote address by Secretary of Labor Tom Perez, who will speak to how the Obama Administration views and confronts the issues of poverty and inequality across our nation, and how the President's recently-announced My Brother's Keeper initiative focusing on the crisis of young men of color seeks to improve outcomes in one segment of America's vulnerable populations.

Following the Secretary's remarks, a panel discussion of foundation CEOs will offer observations about the Presidential initiative, and speak to why and how these foundations are taking action to address the issue. Questions and discourse about inequality, diversity, race, gender as well as navigating the politics of our polarized society through public-private partnership are certain to be raised in this stimulating conversation.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Emmett Carson, CEO and President, Silicon Valley Community Foundation; Antonia Hernandez, President & CEO, California Community Foundation; Patrick McCarthy, President & CEO, The Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Thomas Perez, Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor; Jim Shelton, Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Education; La June Tabron, President and CEO, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation

6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Meet & Mingle Networking Reception

Join the Council and fellow attendees on the Heights Patio of the Hilton Hotel. We are creating an East Coast Boardwalk! Explore the boardwalk with the sounds of an acapella performance by The Capital Singers and capture a fun photo of yourself in the photo booth, all while enjoying complimentary beer, wine, and hors d'oeuvres.

Feel free to come casually comfortable to this evening of fun.

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Networking Breakfast

Breakfast can be found in both the International Ballroom and Council Central. Please feel free to sit by your foundation type to make new connections.

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Education & Philanthropy: Opportunity & Impact

International Ballroom West & Center, Concourse

When done right, education is the ultimate equalizer, but when done wrong, it can be the protector of stratification. Society has struggled for years to level the playing field for all children in order to ensure equal access and opportunity. In a polarized society that is facing astounding workforce and technological changes, education has become a commodity that determines fates of individuals, cultures, cities, regions, and nations. Examine the history of education and its reform effort, and discuss what's on the horizon for the education field and what's needed from philanthropy regarding this polarizing topic.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): David Johns, Executive Director, White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans; Jeff Johnson, Chief of Strategy, Illume Communications; Holiday McKiernan, Chief of Staff and General Counsel, Lumina Foundation; Marc Sternberg, Director K-12 Education Reform, Walton Family Foundation, Inc.

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Election 2014: What's Really at Stake?

Columbia 11 & 12, Terrace Level

The 2014 midterm elections are five short months away, and the 2016 presidential race is already heating up. To help make sense of the horse-race stories and put this year's election into a larger context, join our seasoned group of pundits, pollsters, and prognosticators for a lively conversation about what's really at stake in the coming months - and what changes election night might bring.

Speaker(s): Jonathan Capehart, Opinion Writer, The Washington Post Company; Christopher Gates, President, Sunlight Foundation; Juleanna Glover, Managing Director, Teneo Intelligence, Teneo Holdings LLC; Miles Rapoport, President and CEO, Common Cause

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Inside the 50th Anniversary of the War on Poverty

Lincoln East & West, Concourse Level

Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war on poverty in his State of the Union address, the U.S. poverty rate has fallen only to 15 percent from 19 percent, which means 46 million Americans live in households whose income is barely adequate. Philanthropy has been a tireless champion in the war on poverty, leading the innovation of new connections, programs and models. This concurrent plenary will examine the current state of poverty, discuss the role philanthropy has played over the last 50 years of anti-poverty endeavors, as well as what the next 50 years hold for groups working in the field.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Robert Doar, Morgridge Fellow in Poverty Studies, American Enterprise Institute (AEI); Terri Freeman, President, The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region; Marva Hammons, Executive Vice President of Child and Family Services, Casey Family Programs; Patty Stonesifer, Senior Advisor to the Trustees, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Making Rights Real: Civic Literacy, Media Access, and the Democratic Imperative

International Ballroom East, Concourse Level

More than 50 years since Congress enacted transformative civil and voting rights laws to fully enfranchise all Americans, our rate of voter participation lags behind other Western democracies. Long lines on Election Day are the most visible symptom of this deeper dysfunction. Examine the ways in which current community structure - like schools and the media - as well as public policies hinder and could do more to enhance democratic vibrancy.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Cornell Brooks, President & CEO, New Jersey Institute For Social Justice; Michael Copps, Special Advisor, Media and Democracy Reform Initiative, Federal Communications Commission; Joe Goldman, Director, Democracy Fund; Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO, Voto Latino; Cindy Lott, Senior Counsel, Columbia Law School National State Attorneys General Program; James Silkenat, President, American Bar Association

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Reforming Health Care in Challenging Environments

Jefferson, Concourse Level

Following the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), grantmakers from across the country are leading important efforts to improve the health of all people. Participate in a dynamic and engaging talk-show style session featuring philanthropic leaders who will share their role in leading from behind, in-front and from the middle to identify key partners to overcome barriers and obstacles in real system change efforts. Gain new insights from session participants in highly-participatory solution-focused small group discussion sessions to identify new ideas for ACA implementation in states that are not participating in an exchange or have opted not to expand Medicaid coverage. Hear from leaders of Grantmakers in Health about the complexities of the law and efforts to help funders navigate ACA implementation in challenging environments.

Speaker(s): Chris Adams, President, Engaged Public; Ryan Barker, Vice President of Health Policy, The Missouri Foundation for Health; Ann McMillan MSW, Program Associate, Grantmakers In Health

8:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

The Death and Life of the Environmental Movement: City-Regions Rising

Georgetown, Concourse Level

Speaker(s): David Orr, Paul Sears Distinguished professor of Environmental Studies and Politics, Oberlin College; Richard Stuebi, President & CEO, The Cleveland Foundation

10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Monitor Institute: What's Next for Community Philanthropy

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Civil Legal Aid: A Natural Ally in Tackling Poverty

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

For decades, all over the country, legal aid groups - problem solvers by nature -have been making real change for millions of people. When families need housing, food, or health care, these groups have answers. It is their hard work that corrects bad policy and changes how society treats the most vulnerable. Yet, as a group they are often ignored.

As the gap between the rich and poor continues to grow, civil legal aid is one of the best tools we have to tackle poverty. But unlike serious criminal cases, civil cases do not guarantee a right to counsel, and funding that for decades has sustained legal aid work is now in a state of crisis. 

Yet, opportunities abound. New and innovative programs are reshaping the field and helping more people. Today, civil legal aid is being used as a key strategy to increase the impact of funders&rsquo support in all areas of poverty.

This session will focus on creative solutions to assure access to justice for those living in poverty. Panelists will discuss current barriers, exciting new innovations, and ways to use civil legal aid as a key strategy to bolster foundation programming.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Martha Bergmark, Executive Director, Voices for Civil Justice; Deepak Bhargava, Executive Director, Center for Community Change; James Head, President & CEO, East Bay Community Foundation; Mary McClymont, President, Public Welfare Foundation; James Sandman, President, Legal Services Corporation; Eric Washington, Chief Judge, District of Columbia Court of Appeals

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Complicated Times: Speech and Advocacy in a Changing Environment

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

Our democracy relies upon an informed citizenry and equal access to the political process to thrive. Nonprofits play an important role in educating the public about critical policy and election issues that impact their lives, and foundations often fund these efforts.

In recent years, a number of issues that have a profound impact on how Americans may engage in the political and electoral process have taken center stage. A common thread through these issues the First Amendment and freedom of speech. The Supreme Court decisions in Citizens United and this year's McCutcheon opinion, along with increased scrutiny of the political activity of 501(c)(4) organizations by the Internal Revenue Service, have highlighted fundamental freedom of speech issues from different angles. This confluence of policy activity provides us with a unique starting point for a discussion on the political process, campaign finance issues and the influence of average and not-so-average Americans.

Join our campaign finance and First Amendment experts as we delve into the implications of these policy changes for charitable organizations, and more broadly, for our country's political process. Our panelists will connect the dots among campaign finance law, First Amendment free speech principles, 501(c)(4) regulation, and grassroots advocacy. And most importantly, they'll explain why grantmakers should care about our country's rapidly evolving political finance system.

Speaker(s): Truman Anderson, Executive Director, Stuart Family Foundation; Diana Aviv, President and CEO, Independent Sector; Christopher Gates, President, Sunlight Foundation

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Donors and Scientists Collaborate for Brain Health

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

Donor and family foundation collaboration can be a highly effective strategy in pooling and deploying philanthropic capital with shared short- and long-term outcomes in mind. Join a fascinating discussion on how a group of donors joined forces to tackle the most challenging neurological disorders of our time. Faced with personal and family challenges, these donors have ushered in an exciting time for neuroscience and mental health research and discoveries.

Learn about the donor collaborative model that has been called a venture model of philanthropy. This model deployed over 300M in grants to cutting edge research that produced real innovation, discovery, and hope, as well as an additional 3 billion in resources from government and other funding entities.

Speaker(s): Jeffrey Borenstein, President & CEO, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation; Wayne Farmer, Advisor, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation; Bonnie Hammerschlag, Trustee, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation; Faith Rothblatt, Associate Director, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Lots of Cars in the Garage: Using Multiple Vehicles for Good

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

Many individuals and families now use a range of different giving and investing vehicles in addition to the old standby of foundation grants:

  • individual check-writing of individual trustees
  • donor-advised funds in various places
  • impact investing by the foundation or by individuals
  • giving circles
  • family governed operating organizations and social enterprises
  • planned giving instruments
  • anonymous giving
  • corporate giving by the family business
  • other new innovations in giving
This session will explore how some families and foundations are managing and coordinating their often complicated portfolio of activities, and how some individuals effectively juggle multiple approaches of their own. Panelists will talk about how they coordinate multiple vehicles and people, how they manage the risk and reward of adding non-traditional vehicles, and how they deal with conflicts between individuals, between vehicles when they arise.

Speaker(s): Cedric Brown, CEO, Kapor Center For Social Impact; Mary Galeti, Vice Chair, Tecovas Foundation; Elenore Garton, Director of Strategy and Philanthropic Partnerships, Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation; Michael Moody, Frey Chair for Family Philanthropy, Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy, , Johnson Center For Philanthropy; Chet Tchozewski, Board Member, Chino Cienega Foundation

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Family Philanthropy and Impact Investing: Are Intermediaries the Answer?

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

When a family foundation decides to make impact investments often known as program-related or mission-related investments made into companies, organizations, and funds with the intention to generate measurable social and environmental impact alongside a financial return how does the foundation decide whether to make impact investments directly, or do so through an intermediary? Some foundations, especially those with limited staff capacity, see direct investment as too burdensome and risky and opt to invest through intermediaries. Others recognize the benefits that come from direct investment and champion that method. This session, focused on the unique considerations of family foundations, will offer an introduction to impact investing from industry leaders, then explore the challenges and benefits of making impact investments directly or investing through intermediaries like Community Development Financial Institutions. Learn how family foundations can make catalytic investments and hear about past investment experiences from family foundations.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Melanie Audette, Deputy Director, Mission Investors Exchange; Peter Brach, Program Advisor and Analyst, Brach Family Charitable Foundation; Abhilash Mudaliar, Research Manager, Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN); Cynthia Muller, Director, Impact Investing, Arabella Philanthropic Investment Advisors

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Foundations, Collaboration, and the Post-2015 Agenda

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

The global challenges facing humanity on issues such as poverty, health, equality, and environmental sustainability require collaboration between philanthropic entities, private organizations, and governments. Following the United Nations Millennium Summit in 2000, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were established as targets for global efforts to address these most pressing problems. All 189 United Nations member states at the time made commitments to support efforts to achieve these goals by 2015.

As 2015 approaches, governments, intergovernmental organizations, and representatives from various sectors have begun considering a framework that would replace the MDGs. Leaders from the philanthropic, private, and public sectors agree that the Post 2015 Agenda goals - commonly referred to as Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - must be developed in a collaborative manner that engages all stakeholders and considers how the SDGs will link social, economic, and environmental dimensions of well-being. 

This session builds upon a March 2014 meeting of foundations and networks interested in greater collaboration around the post-2015 Agenda. The discussion will focus on the Sustainable Development Goals, examples of other global efforts that involve philanthropy, and offer insights for how more funders can participate in the development of the SDGs that will guide a huge share of aid for the next 15 years.

Speaker(s): Edmund Cain, Vice President, Grant Programs, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation; Robert Garris, Managing Director, The Rockefeller Foundation; Heather Grady, Independent Philanthropy Advisor, Independent Philanthropy Advisor; Penelope Lewis, Head of Global Foundations Program, The World Bank; Karolina Mzyk, Program Specialist, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP); Bradford Smith, President, Foundation Center

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

News Literacy: A Case Study in the Role of Philanthropy in a Divided Democracy

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

Examine the emerging field of news literacy, which provides students with the critical-thinking skills to know what to believe in the digital age and the tools to become more engaged and informed citizens. The panel, which features some of the news literacy's earliest funders and leading practitioners, will address the mission's importance to education, the future of quality journalism, and the health of the country's democracy.

Speaker(s): Alison Bernstein, Vice President, Knowledge, Creativity & Freedom, Rutgers University; David Hiller, President and CEO, McCormick Foundation; Alan Miller, President and CEO, The News Literacy Project; Howard Schneider, Dean, School of Journalism, Stony Brook University; Ray Suarez, Journalist, Al Jazeera America, LLC

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Teaching Adolescents to Become Learners: The Role of Noncognitive Factors in Shaping School Performance

As Paul Tough wrote in the recent New York Times Magazine piece entitled Who Gets to Graduate, Rich Kids Graduate Poor Kids Don't. Tough writes that only about a quarter of first-year college students from the bottom half of the income distribution earn a baccalaureate degree by the time they are 24. Though the statistics are grim, a number of new efforts across the education spectrum are focusing on student attitudes and beliefs about learning-called academic mindsets-to help learners persist through challenge, complete courses and earn better grades. This panel will explore several efforts, including new research networks and a major national initiative that integrates mindsets into pedagogy. The session also will explore the role of foundations in building this new field.

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The Strange Life & Death of Bipartisan Environmentalism

International Ballroom East, Concourse Level

Get a social and political overview of the recent history of the American environmental agenda, with special attention paid to the particular roles played by foundations and individual grantors. How did we get so stuck? Do we dare to dream of bipartisan environmentalism? On which issues, and through which lenses?

Speaker(s): Deb Callahan, Director, Colorado River Sustainability Campaign; Conn Nugent, Principal, The J.M. Kaplan Fund, Inc.; Thomas Wathen, Vice President, Environment, The Pew Charitable Trusts

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Washington Update: Tax Reform is Coming - What Now?

Monroe, Concourse Level

Curious about how the fast-paced, animated, and sometimes-dysfunctional D.C. policy environment can trickle down to influence your work? Do you wonder about whether tax reform will ever happen and, when it does, how these changes will impact philanthropy? Come hear how the decisions being made here in our nation's capital affect the work you do in your community! 

Momentum is building for a major overhaul of our tax code, and it is imperative for philanthropic organizations to weigh in on the conversation. In February, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-MI-4) released his tax reform discussion draft, with many proposed changes that would have a direct bearing on individuals' giving incentives as well as the way in which tax-exempt organizations go about their business. In the Senate, Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden (D-OR) has expressed strong interest in tax reform. Action on the regulatory front and the expiration of tax extenders will add additional topics to the discussions.

Our panel of D.C. insiders will dive into these issues and discuss why they matter to you. Come hear how you can engage on these issues and ensure your voice is heard.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Suzanne Friday, Senior Counsel and V.P. of Legal Affairs, Council on Foundations; Alexander Reid, Of Counsel, Morgan Lewis; Sue Santa, Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Legal Affairs, Council on Foundations; Eugene Steuerle, Institute Fellow, The Urban Institute; Mark Warren, Tax Counsel, Committee on Ways and Means, United States House of Representatives

11:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

WRAG Affordable Housing Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

The need for defining what affordable housing is as well as providing opportunities to access these resources is a multi-pronged issue critical to assisting many families in combating poverty. Prince George's County's leadership is tackling this issue head-on through its Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative (TNI). The tour, conducted in collaboration with the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers, will take participants to Langley Park, MD to a housing development which is part of the Prince George's County Executives Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative (TNI). TNI is directing a full spectrum of cross-agency resources in six unique communities that face some of the greatest challenges associated with crime, school statistics, and health care disparity. We will hear from affordable housing experts, and housing and community development practitioners to learn how TNI, as well as current and previous housing and community development efforts, are transforming and strengthening communities and where there is more work to be done to improve neighborhood housing, education, health, and safety.

12:00 p.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Poverty Interrupted: A Behavioral Approach to Help Children Escape Poverty

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

12:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Junior Achievement Finance Park

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

In a time when the United States is challenged with staying globally competitive, it is our young people that we must prepare to be future business leaders, entrepreneurs and innovators starting with empowering them to own their economic success early in life. The tour will take participants by bus to Junior Achievement Finance Park in Fairfax, VA. In concert with Fairfax County Public Schools, and with the support of the local business community, Junior Achievement constructed a state-of-the-art 20,000 square-foot facility on the Frost-Woodson Campus in Fairfax, Virginia delivering high-tech, high-touch financial educational experiences to more than 14,000 middle school students each year. The tour will take the group through the facility, discuss the mission and importance of this resource for youth in schools as well as for adults in alternative education programs, and will also discuss the multi-sectorial partnerships at play to make this program a reality.

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Lunch Break

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Lunch buffets can be found in Columbia Hall and the International Terrace. While this is a networking lunch break, please note, the annual Meeting of the Members will take place during the lunch hour in the International Ballroom.

Speaker(s): Eugene Cochrane, President, The Duke Endowment; Sherry Magill, President, Jessie Ball duPont Fund; Kevin Murphy, President, Berks County Community Foundation; Diana Sieger, President, Grand Rapids Community Foundation (MI); Vikki Spruill, President & CEO, Council on Foundations

12:45 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.

CAF America: IRS Rules & Best Practices for International Grantmaking

Columbia Hall North, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Anacostia River/Chesapeake Bay Watershed Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

The Nation's Capital is divided into two separate but unequal parts by the beautiful but polluted Anacostia River and the 1200 acres of surrounding federal land. To the west are the grand monuments, most government buildings, the downtown, and several wealthy neighborhoods. To the east, some middle class neighborhoods are interspersed with areas of poverty, blight, and persistent social challenges. An ambitious plan to clean the river, promote sustainable economic development, and create a world-class riverside park was created more than a decade ago under then-Mayor Anthony Williams. Some very interesting elements have succeeded, including the world's first green professional sports stadium and a vibrant new riverside neighborhood, but others have been stalled. Participants will meet inside the Nationals Stadium to hear former Mayor Williams speak of the centrality of the area to the Nation's Capital vision and his ongoing efforts to transform it, then board two small boats to tour the river area.

Please note that the majority of this site session takes place on a boat, and there will be a 10 minute walk between sites. Please wear comfortable attire.

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

We as a nation should not just be preparing youth to succeed in competitive colleges, but to also empower them to be change agents in their communities and the larger society to create a more just, free, and equal world. The tour will take participants by bus to the Csar Chvez Public Charter Schools for Public Policy's facility near Howard University. The Chavez Schools started with a vision to prepare inner city students to pursue a college education and take an active role in addressing important social issues in their communities. The Schools started with 60 students in the basement of a Safeway and now serves 1,400 students in three campuses from grades 6 - 12. Join us for a tour to learn the incredible history of this program, and how the dual mission of college prep and public policy has prepared hundreds of students to be effective in the democratic process.

Session Materials :

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Crime - A Rupture of the Social Contract: Strategies to Reconnect the Mistrusting and Disconnected

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

Violence affects all aspects of life and results in considerable physical, emotional, social, and economic consequences. It is a serious public health problem that affects people in large cities, small towns, and rural areas across the United States. Organizations of various types (civic, governmental, nonprofit, advocacy) are seeking ways to participate meaningfully in reducing violence and fostering safe communities. The philanthropic sector has played a catalytic role in assisting local and national efforts, and it can play an essential role in helping to support and, in some cases, lead promising violence prevention efforts across the nation. This highly interactive session will explore violence prevention from various angles: creating law enforcement/citizen trust reconnecting kids to school improving outcomes for young men and boys of color forging community/city and county linkages and forging inter-agency linkages to reduce violence and build healthy communities.

Speaker(s): John Calhoun, Senior Consultant, National League of Cities; Charles Fields, Regional Program Manager, Los Angeles, The California Endowment; Jennifer Maconochie, Director, Strategic Initiatives & Policies, Boston Police Department; Georgina McDowell, Former Salinas, CA Community Safety Director, Community Alliance For Safety and Peace; Theron Pride, Senior Advisor, Department of Justice Programs, National Forum of Youth Violence Prevention; Barbara Raymond, Director, Schools & Neighborhoods, The California Endowment

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

DC Vote Bus Tour

Please meet at the T Street Enterance on the Terrarce Level of the Washington Hilton 15 minutes prior to departure.

Americans living in our nation's capital, the epicenter of democracy, fulfill all of the obligations of citizenship pay full federal taxes, fight and die in wars, and serve on juries yet are still denied voting representation in the US Congress. This learning tour will take participants off the beaten path of the usual monuments and sites through several of the eight wards in Washington, DC. The tour will share the untold political story of the city including the role of the lack of voting rights in the disenfranchisement of residents for decades. Speakers will discuss various dynamics of a city with structural discrimination, disenfranchisement, and swiftly changing demographics of residents and the actual political system that negatively affects the lives of its residents. Attendees will also visit lesser known memorials in the city that are uniquely D.C. and learn of their significance in the daily lives of residents.

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Family Foundations in Practice: Choosing and Preparing Your Grantmaking Successors

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

One of the greatest sources of joy and opportunity, anxiety, and frustration for philanthropic families may be the transfer of wealth, responsibility, and values from one generation to the next. This interactive session will delve into the particular challenges and best practices for succession in family foundation governance. Through a case study and small group discussion, participants will learn about generational succession that honors a donor's legacy and reflects the family's values. The experience of the Clare family will serve as a framework for discussing:

  • Designing an effective governance structure
  • Selecting board members
  • Engaging the next generation
  • Adopting a collective mission and goals

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Mary Phillips, President, GMA Foundations; Kathy Whelpley, Executive Vice President, National Center for Family Philanthropy

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Philanthropy as Movement: Next Generation Philanthropic Leadership's Active Investment in Social Change

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

Have you ever met a young social entrepreneur or a young activist? You know the type, someone who obsesses about a particular cause or specific business model to address social and environmental issues. What happens when a young member of a big business family meets this person? Unite passion, discipline, and resources and you get a flame that inspires and can illuminate an entire sector. Come learn from members of Nexus, a global youth movement increase and improve philanthropy by uniting unlikely allies and democratizing philanthropic deliberation.

Speaker(s): Patrick Gage, Treasurer, The Curtis L. Carlson Family Foundation; Mary Galeti, Vice Chair, Tecovas Foundation; Jonah Wittkamper, Co-Founder & Global Director, Nexus Network

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Fostering Bipartisan Problem Solving

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

The political divide in Washington looks like it is here to stay, so those in the world of philanthropy must find ways to forge common ground and solve critical problems facing our country. Two leaders at the forefront of efforts to bring Republicans and Democrats together will discuss the opportunities and challenges for making government work. Jason Grumet is the President of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a think tank that actively promotes bipartisanship. BPC brings together experts and leaders from across the aisle to find bipartisan solutions to difficult problems. BPC recently created a national Commission on Political Reform to develop policy recommendations for reducing the impact of polarization. Nancy Jacobson is the co-founder of No Labels, a growing citizens' movement of Democrats, Republicans and Independents dedicated to promoting a new politics of problem solving. The organization has formed a coalition of more than 90 members of Congress who are committed to regular across-the-aisle meetings, embracing the new attitude of problem solving and being real leaders. The panel will be moderated by Joe Goldman, who leads the Democracy Fund, which supports BPC and No Labels as part of its initiative to reduce political gridlock and hyper-partisanship.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Joe Goldman, Director, Democracy Fund; Jason Grumet, Founder and President, Bipartisan Policy Center; Nancy Jacobson, Founder, No Labels

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Leveraging Community Knowledge in an Increasingly Connected World

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

Many community and place-based funders have been harnessing community knowledge to further their respective missions. Not surprisingly, foundations initially focus on the details of collecting data and creating reports the how' and the what' and the when.' But those initial forays quickly expanded into much larger conversations about mobilizing community knowledge. And these conversations raised important questions: Why is knowledge important to our communities? What role does it play? How can it enrich our lives and our vision of the future?

Speaker(s): Michael Batchelor, President, The Erie Community Foundation; Bahia Ramos Synnott, Program Director, Community Foundations, John S. & James L. Knight Foundation; Lee Rose, Director, Community Foundations of Canada; Bina Venkataraman, Senior Advisor on Climate Change Innovation, The White House

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Multi-Sectoral Collaboration: A Recipe for Disasters...or Not?

Georgetown East, Concourse Level

Natural disasters affect millions of people globally every year. Trends indicate that natural disasters are becoming more frequent and destructive, impacting communities and economies globally. How we prepare for and respond to these events is becoming increasingly important. Philanthropy has a role to play not only in immediate relief and recovery, but also in mitigation, risk reduction and resilience building. The session will bring together experts from philanthropy, the private sector, and government to discuss with attendees how funders can work in multi-sectoral partnerships to more effectively mitigate the risks of disasters.

Speaker(s): Jainey Bavishi, Executive Director for APDR3, University of Hawaii Foundation; Irene Hirano, President, Chair of the Board of Trustees, Ford Foundation; Alfonso Martinez-Fonts, Executive Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation; Tony Pipa, Deputy Assistant Administrator, Foundation For Louisiana

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Re-committing to Rural America: The Expanding Crisis of Rural Poverty and Its Effects

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

A rapid process of urbanization has intensified economic stresses in rural America. Fully a third of all non-urban counties in the U.S. now have childhood poverty rates of 30% and above. Philanthropic leaders have repeatedly tried to rally foundations around the development of a common agenda for addressing rural poverty, but the scale of the problem is growing faster than existing efforts.

This session will begin with a presentation on existing challenges facing rural America, including a special emphasis on economic trends and the causes of poverty. Foundation leaders will talk about strategic efforts they've undertaken to address poverty and economic development challenges in the communities they serve. The leading rural development expert at the U.S. Department of Agriculture will also discuss government efforts to work with philanthropy to address rural housing, business, and utilities development challenges.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Tracey Dorsett, Program Officer, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; Charles Fluharty, President and CEO, Rural Policy Research Institute; Doug O'Brien, Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); Carla Roberts, President and CEO, Fremont Area Community Foundation (MI); Kevin Walker, President and CEO, Northwest Area Foundation

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Retrofitting Movements: A Pioneer’s Guide to Advancing Advocacy in a Networked World

Monroe, Concourse Level

In a world being dramatically reshaped by the power of networks and technology, how can philanthropy support nonprofit leaders on the front lines of social advocacy especially as they run organizations and movements founded well before the advent of the internet? What does this look like in the real world?

In this interactive session, learn how funders can partner with pioneering nonprofit leaders in this case, an 80 year-old civil rights bellwether addressing immigration and criminal justice - to embrace technology and breakthrough forms of collaboration.

Our panelists will share their perspectives on what it means for philanthropy to take risks on &ldquouncredentialed&rdquo approaches to advance justice in response to a rapidly changing landscape. Explore how this approach is making waves nationally and how established and emerging movements are reenergizing by using new pathways to advance equality and inclusion. 

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Heather Grant, Consultant, Levi Strauss Foundation; Daniel Lee, Executive Director, Levi Strauss Foundation; Abdi Soltani, Executive Director, ACLU of Northern California

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

What’s Your Encore? Producing Talent Windfalls to Solve Society’s Challenges

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

Millions are already in the midst of inventing a new stage of life and work the encore years between the end of midlife and anything resembling old-fashioned retirement. Envision this chapter as a time when you make some of your most important contributions, for ourselves, for our world, for the well-being of future generations. Inventing a new stage of life is an ambitious undertaking, one of the great social innovation projects of the 21st century. Yet this aspiration will be as much about small changes as big ones. If you share the dream of supporting efforts to produce, together, a windfall of talent to help solve society's greatest challenges, from education to the environment, health care to poverty then join this session featuring the founder of visionary leader behind Encore Careers. Thanks to the experience dividend now being realized around the world, we have the time and energy to live a legacy, instead of just leaving one. So what are you going to do for your encore?

Speaker(s): Marc Freedman, Founder/CEO, Civic Ventures; Lester Strong, Chief Executive Officer, AARP Experience Corps, AARP

2:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

NGOsource: The Centralized Equivalency Determination Repository

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

President Obama’s Social Innovation Fund at Five… Where it’s been, and where it’s going

Gunston, Terrace Level

Please join Social Innovation Fund director (and former foundation executive) Michael Smith for an intimate discussion on one of the president's key philanthropic partnerships aimed at growing effective solutions. The Social Innovation Fund was established in 2009 with a simple goal find solutions that work and make them work for more people. Since that time, SIF has partnered with 20 grantmaking institutions to provide over a half billion dollars in public and private funds to more than 200 innovative, evidence-based non-profits working to transform low income communities. The SIF will announce the results of its largest funding competition this fall, including a new Pay for Success pilot grant program that will be announced later this month. Come share your thoughts with Michael and hear what's working, what needs to be improved, what your colleagues are learning at the forefront of federal partnerships and scaling solutions that work.

Read an update on the Social Innovation Fund: Innovation to Impact: Obama's Social Innovation Fund at Four - Stanford Social Innovation Review.

Speaker(s): Michael Smith, Director, Social Innovation Fund, Corporation for National and Community Service

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Kaiser Permanente: Community Approaches and Electronic Data Collections

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Blue-Sky Discussion: Joining Forces to Achieve Community Resilience

Columbia 11 & 12, Terrace Level

Imagine what it would be like if the planets aligned perfectly! This is the session to make that happenon the issue of climate resilience. Join this ideation seminar to help shape possible collaborations between foundations and federal agencies to improve public climate literacy and community resilience in the face of global environmental change. The recent release of the National Climate Assessment, the Climate Data Initiative, and the recent IPCC report indicate the time is right for an all hands on deck response to the challenges communities will continue to face as the climate changes

Be part of a what-if conference table with policy and science officials from the US Global Change Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, and White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Council on Environmental Quality. Questions for exploration: Should the government catalyze larger scale efforts through connection points between federal agencies and philanthropic organizations? What cross sector investments should be leveraged to advance climate literacy and resilience? How could foundations help federal agencies understand what communities need to know about climate change impacts? Would foundations be interested in participating on a federal climate resiliency partnerships working group? At least one follow-up action will be identified.
Moderator: Sarah E. Schoedinger, M.S, Senior Program Manager, US Dept of Commerce, Office of Education, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Speaker(s): Lin Chambers, Project Scientist, NASA; Jill Karsten, Program Director, GEO Education and Diversity, National Science Foundation

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Crowd Noise: The Millennial Generation and Strategic Philanthropy

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

Millennials are fueling the growth of innovative approaches such as crowdfunding, microlending, and mobile giving often choosing tools that allow them to direct their philanthropy at small-scale projects and causes that provide tangible results. But as this massive generation matures and builds wealth, will it continue to favor giving that provides instant gratification? If so, will philanthropy be reduced to attempts to address small-scale symptoms of problems rather than efforts to attack the root causes of these problems?

Join us for a thought-provoking discussion that will explore the giving habits of the millennial generation and discuss how these habits will affect philanthropy in the coming decades. Will this generation - often lauded for its philanthropic spirit - live up to its promise and develop innovative results to long-held problems? Can millennial-favored giving vehicles evolve into tools that help philanthropy become more strategic? Or will small-scale giving become the new norm?

Speaker(s): Derrick Feldman, President, Achieve; Peter Panepento, Vice President, Network, Council on Foundations; Katherina Rosqueta, Founding Executive Director of The Center for High Impact Philanthropy, University of Pennsylvania

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Catalyzing Change in Your Community

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

It's often said that foundations don't have the resources to tackle big problems in our society. Yet foundations are perfectly positioned to be catalysts for change on complex issues, especially in their communities. This program for family foundations as well as non-family funders, spotlights the unique powers, position, and non-dollar assets that foundations leverage to make outsized impact on important, urgent issues. We'll explore essential strategies such as taking the time to understand the issue and building knowledge, using the knowledge to identify gaps and points of leverage, engaging, mobilizing, and connecting partners, working longer-term, taking higher risks, raising public awareness, and often-seeking to influence policy. The session will emphasize ways to get started. Discover how to use your unique assets and position as a funder to be a force for change

Speaker(s): Andy Carroll, Senior Program Manager, Exponent Philanthropy; Janis Reischmann, Executive Director, Hau'oli Mau Loa Foundation; Martha Toll, Executive Director, Butler Family Fund

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Family Philanthropy - Philanthropy as Personal Expression: Solutions, Values or Ideologies

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

As the range of giving vehicles and kinds of donors has expanded dramatically in recent years, philanthropy has increasingly become an outlet for promulgating an agenda or personal belief system instead of trying to solve a problem or issue. From the Koch brothers to George Soros, today's "philanthactivists" use a wide array of strategies to advance their values - such as political contributions and investing - in addition to their charitable contributions. Additionally, major contributions from individuals are all receiving far greater scrutiny in order to interpret personal agendas or ideology. This session will explore how contemporary donors are expressing and acting on their values through their giving, and the implications this has on grantees.

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Moving Against the Tide, Until You Turn It: A Historic Year for LGBTQ Equality

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

The movements for LGBTQ equality and advancement have created a fundamental shift in thinking and social attitudes in a remarkably short period of time. Many high-profile successes in 2013 have secured a place in history for one of the country's most notable and effective civil rights efforts. This important moment provides an opportunity to reflect on the role that organized philanthropy has played in fostering efforts to advance LGBTQ people and their allies.

This session will open with a presentation on current levels of philanthropic funding for LGBTQ related issues. Leading national figures will then discuss various aspects of how certain groups built support for important issues, like the freedom to marry, broader understandings of gender, and corporate philanthropy.

Speaker(s): Deena Fidas, Director, Workplace Project, Human Rights Campaign; Kevin Jennings, Executive Director, Arcus Foundation; Ben Maulbeck, President, Funders for LGBTQ Issues; Evan Wolfson, Founder and President, Freedom To Marry

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Re-Emerging Art of Funding Innovation

Georgetown East, Concourse Level

"Innovation" is everywhere you look. The term is used so widely and so vaguely that it's come to mean almost anything, or, worse - nothing at all. But innovation has been an essential part of philanthropy from long before it became a buzzword. The field has a rich history of private funders using their resources to seed experiments with the potential to produce outsized social returns. Building on the Monitor Institute's recent cover story in the spring issue of Stanford Social Innovation Review, this interactive session aims to introduce participants to the core concepts of innovation funding and to help them understand how the processes for intentionally funding innovation differ from those of more traditional grantmaking approaches.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Gabriel Kasper, Senior Manager, Monitor Institute; Sarah Koch, Director, Social Innovation, The Case Foundation; Justin Marcoux, Manager, Monitor Institute

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Taking Impact Investing to the Next Level: From Your Foundation to the Global Stage

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

Many foundations and individuals believe in the power of making investments that seek a social and financial return. The global conversation on impact investing, a tool that complements charitable giving, entered the center-stage last summer when a G8 task force formed to develop a policy framework that would accelerate impact investing, establish a global approach to measure social outcomes, and encourage greater engagement across foundations, institutions and private investors. This session will provide an overview of the range of strategies through which foundations of all sizes can make impact investments, and offer an opportunity to discuss impact investing policy. Session participants will learn about various policy approaches, share reactions to them, and discuss how foundations can move impact investing forward.

Speaker(s): Kate Ahern, Vice President, Social Innovation, The Case Foundation; Melanie Audette, Deputy Director, Mission Investors Exchange; Peter Berliner, Managing Director, Mission Investors Exchange; Peter Berliner, Managing Director, Philanthropy Northwest; Katie Grace, Program Manager, Initiative for Responsible Investment, Harvard Kennedy School; Rosita Najmi, Associate, Knowledge & Advocacy, Omidyar Network Fund, Inc.; Laura Tomasko, Network Developer, Council on Foundations; Lisa Woll, CEO, US SIF

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

The Role of Religions in an Increasingly Polarized Society

Monroe, Concourse Level

What is the role of religion in an increasingly polarized society? What should it be? What can religious/spiritual groups do to bring about harmony in a polarized society? Examine these and similar questions while learning about examples of religious efforts to mitigate the polarization.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Michael Balinsky, Executive Vice President, Chicago Board of Rabbis; Janaan Hashim, Trustee, Council For A Parliament of the World's Religions; Malik Mujahid, Chair, Council For A Parliament of the World's Religions; Mary Nelson, Executive Director, Council For A Parliament of the World's Religions; Cheryl Tupper, Vice President for Religion and Healthcare, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations

3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

What is Philanthropy's Role in Supporting or Building Movements?

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

All federal civil rights legislation is the result of social movements. This session contends that social movements, local and otherwise, are just as important now to the philanthropic sector as they were in the history of this country's efforts to bring democracy to everyone.

Speaker(s): Alexandra Delvalle, Program Director, Third Wave Foundation; Shawn Dove, Campaign Manager, Open Society Foundations; Cristina Jimenez, Co-Founder & Managing Director, United We Dream; Sally Kohn, Director, Movement Vision Lab, Center for Community Change; Saket Soni, Executive Director, New Orleans Workers' Center For Racial Justice; Luz Vega-Marquis, President & CEO, Marguerite Casey Foundation

3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Why Strategic Communications Matters for the Causes We Care About

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

The philanthropy sector tackles some of the biggest problems of our day, like climate change, education and health care reform, and the provision of vital services for those in need. In our field, there's a growing realization that part of the change foundations support involves the intelligent use of communications strategies and tactics.

Foundations need to think about communications both in terms of their own organizational voices and brands as well as the grantmaking strategies they develop and execute.

In this session, some of the field's leading communications professionals will share some of the latest and best trends in strategic communications. They will emphasize recent research to gather evidence on what constitutes effective communications for social change and impact. They will also talk about how communications partnerships with nonprofits are increasingly important for successful communication.

Speaker(s): Rebecca Arno, Vice President of Communications, The Denver Foundation; David Brotherton, President, Brotherton Strategies; Alfred Ironside, Director of Communications, Ford Foundation; Minna Jung, Communications Director, The David & Lucile Packard Foundation; Joanne Krell, Vice President for Communications, W.K. Kellogg Foundation

3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Stategic Research on the Foundation Sector

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Happy Hour in Council Central

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Reception Row!

This "buffet-style" networking event offers a series of simultaneous receptions. Join conversations related to the issues closest to you and build new relationships. Visit one or all of them:

  • EPIP Oaklawn Room
  • CAF America Jay Room
  • Public Interest Projects Morgan Room
  • Family Philanthropy Kalorama Room
  • California-Arizona-Nevada Network Holmead Rooml
  • New England Network Independence Room,
  • Communications Network L'Enfant Room
  • Exponent Philanthorpy Northwest Room

All Reception Row events are located in the Heights Meeting Rooms on the Lobby Level.

10:30 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

President Obama’s Social Innovation Fund at Five… Where it’s been, and where it’s going

Gunston, Terrace Level

Please join Social Innovation Fund director (and former foundation executive) Michael Smith for an intimate discussion on one of the president's key philanthropic partnerships aimed at growing effective solutions. The Social Innovation Fund was established in 2009 with a simple goal find solutions that work and make them work for more people. Since that time, SIF has partnered with 20 grantmaking institutions to provide over a half billion dollars in public and private funds to more than 200 innovative, evidence-based non-profits working to transform low income communities. The SIF will announce the results of its largest funding competition this fall, including a new Pay for Success pilot grant program that will be announced later this month. Come share your thoughts with Michael and hear what's working, what needs to be improved, what your colleagues are learning at the forefront of federal partnerships and scaling solutions that work.

Read an update on the Social Innovation Fund: Innovation to Impact: Obama's Social Innovation Fund at Four - Stanford Social Innovation Review.

Speaker(s): Michael Smith, Director, Social Innovation Fund, Corporation for National and Community Service

7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Breakfast Plenary: Bringing the Nation Together: Building a Community of Support for Veterans and their Families

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

Foundations are well positioned to respond to the needs of a new generation of American military veterans. Funders are joining public sector and business partners all over the nation to help veterans and military families make a successful transition back into their communities. The time is right to harness our great American community spirit toward a more comprehensive, holistic welcome back to America's all-volunteer force who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, including our neighbors in the National Guard and the Reserves.

Meet and greet delegations of veterans and spouses from the Blue Star Families, the Military Spouse JD Career Network, and Hope for the Warriors who will be attending the breakfast as guests of the Council. Plenary speakers will highlight the critical role foundations and non-profits play in creating welcoming communities for these families as they return to civilian life. A roundtable discussion with funders of the Joining Forces Impact Pledge, veterans, and civic engagement leaders will interact with the audience who will be invited to tweet their ideas about community engagement opportunities and philanthropic leadership roles.

Let us lead our communities toward the partnerships needed to insure there are no closed doors to those who have served our nation during a time of war.

Speaker(s): Melissa Beach, Director, Training & Services, San Antonio Area Foundation; Catharine Grimes, Director, corporate Philanthropy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc.; Miguel Howe, Director, Military Service Initiative, George W. Bush Institute; James Isenhower, Director of Warrior and Family Support, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Peter Long, President and CEO, Blue Shield of California Foundation; Vikki Spruill, President & CEO, Council on Foundations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

All Together Now: Collaborative Approaches to Learning and Evaluation

Monroe, Concourse Level

Evaluation can be a powerful tool to help improve the results of our work and prevent us from repeating mistakes. But who benefits most from the field's eagerness to know what works? Is it the grantmaker or the grantee delivering programs and services? Has evaluation and learning inadvertently become too foundation-centric? By designing and implementing evaluations in a more collaboratively way, grantmakers can create powerful and valuable mechanisms for real-time improvement for both themselves and their grantees. Learn from grantmakers who take an engaged approach to learning and evaluation, support peer learning, and take the time to reflect on both successes and failures. Explore how these practices can bring a more collaborative focus and build grantee and community capacity for this work.

Speaker(s): Allison Barmann, Strategy and Learning Vice President, The Bush Foundation; Dena Jackson, VP - Grants and Research, Dallas Women's Foundation; Heather Peeler, Vice President of Member & Partner Engagement, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Building Financial Security For Women Over a Lifetime: A Focus on Family Economic Empowerment

Georgetown East, Concourse Level

Poverty alleviation efforts require us to think about how each member of a family unit is impacted by social and economic forces. As we gain perspective on the individual family members, we better understand how to design and fund programs that build community while addressing specific social issues. Though this seems clear, grantmaking sometimes has the unintended consequence of creating fractures in society by deciding to direct funding toward one group over another. This session will discuss how understanding each member of the family unit is important as we design and implement programs tailored to specific family members such as women and girls.

Today, more women and girls are living healthier lives than ever. Concerted partnerships between governments, business, health professionals, and the media have led to an unprecedented expansion of interventions for girls at the most critical stages in their lives, so significant gains have been made in women's economic empowerment.

But too many women face significant economic challenges, especially because of inequalities in the workplace. Women earn less money than men, face hiring discrimination, work in less profitable industries, and must confront social expectations that often limit their time and choices. Because women live longer than men, the impact of these disparities gets magnified over the span of their lives.

By exploring social fracture through the lens of gender, this session will focus on philanthropy's ability to enhance women's financial security. The session will begin with an introduction to how gender impacts the economic lives of both women and men. Panelists will then look at efforts to increase the economic security of low-wage women, address philanthropic priorities, and examine strategies for improving the long-term financial security of working women. The purpose of the session is to discuss philanthropy's role in poverty alleviation through women and the transfer of wealth.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Stephanie Bell-Rose, Senior Managing Director and Head of the TIAA-CREF Institute, TIAA-CREF Institute; Kilolo Kijakazi, Program Officer, Ford Foundation; Jen Klein, Senior Policy Advisor, No Ceilings Project, Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation; Riki Wilchins, Executive Director, TrueChild

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Considering a Perpetuity or Spend Down Strategy?

Lincoln West, Concourse Level

Practicing effective philanthropy brings enormous benefits to the communities your foundation serves. But what does it mean to practice effective philanthropy? Some argue that establishing a foundation with the intention of spending the foundation's resources in a specific period of time creates a helpful urgency in efforts to fulfill your mission. Others say that establishing a foundation to exist in perpetuity is the best way to achieve your goals. Participants will have a chance to listen and participate in a discussion with two leaders who lead a foundation that use one of these strategies. Listen to these leaders share their thoughts, and then join in a discussion with your foundation peers about the best way forward.

Speaker(s): John Rohe, Vice President of Philanthropy, Colcom Foundation; Jeffrey Solomon, President, Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies, Inc.; Kathleen Starr, Vice President of Capital Deployment, The F.B. Heron Foundation; Laura Tomasko, Network Developer, Council on Foundations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Family Philanthropy - It's All About Relationships: Engaging Difference in the Philanthropic Community

Columbia 3 & 4, Terrace Level

Our country and our world are deeply divided. Too many people have lost the capacity or the will to listen thoughtfully, to talk respectfully, and to relate constructively. Naturally, many organizations seek to alleviate our many challenges through attention to the issue. This model, though almost universal, is flawed. An alternative and growing method, that has a substantive and credible history in both democratic practice and statecraft, is the Relationship Paradigm, born out of the Sustained Dialogue Movement, which defines dialogue as listening deeply enough to another to be changed by what you hear. It promotes one central idea: that however seemingly insurmountable the presenting challenge, that the problem is almost always the failure of relationships.

Intentional and prolonged attention to relationships will resolve challenges. The Paradigm is rooted in what was used to negotiate the Camp David Peace Accords and Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty, and has grown into a leading effort to address race, gender, and diversity questions on 30 college campuses, to address democratic conflict on Capitol Hill, and to enhance employee engagement in workplaces.

During this session, participants will practice applying the Five Elements of Relationship to a real-time challenge in the sector and take this tool with them into their professional lives. Explore identity, interests, power, perceptions, and patterns of interaction. Participants will trace the history of the movement that is bringing a new transformational and practical alternative to conflict resolution in democratic practice and current social challenges domestically and around the world.

Speaker(s): Amy Lazarus, Executive Director, Sustained Dialogue Institute

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Family Philanthropy - Leading Through Change: Advice from Seasoned Family Foundation CEOs

Columbia 6, Terrace Level

Using findings from the just-released NCFP publication, Leading through Change: Advice From and for Seasoned CEOs, the session will offer insights into how family foundation CEOs have forged long-term, successful careers in challenging positions. The session, designed for both CEOs and their boards, will address the life cycles most long-time family foundations go through, such as a shift to a new generation, the death of the donor or board leader, large fluctuations of assets, changing grantmaking priorities, and changing community needs. Three veteran CEOs will share the ways they have led through these transitions, and audience members will be invited to raise additional issues from their own experiences.

Speaker(s): Peter Bird, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Frist Foundation; Christine Elbel, Executive Director, Fleishhacker Foundation; Susan Price, Vice President, National Center for Family Philanthropy; Martha Toll, Executive Director, Butler Family Fund

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Federalism 2.0 Means Doing it Outside of the Beltway

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

In an environment of a polarized, partisan Congress and a fractured relationship between the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, this session will argue that these circumstances present a set of drivers that are changing the roles of federal, state and local governments. Many State and local leaders are expressing concern about growing social and economic inequality and its consequences for economies, citizen engagement, political participation, non-profit delivery systems, and schools.

Our guest speakers will discuss the trends emerging in American governance as a result of to sustained inaction at the national level to address critical economic issues and growing social problems. What role will foundations and the community leadership groups they fund play in this new concept of federalism?

In the absence of federal leadership, is it a silver lining that state and local governments will lead of the nation's social innovations for the foreseeable future?

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Jennifer Bradley, Fellow and Senior Advisor, Metropolitan Policy Program, The Brookings Institution; Dan Carol, Board Member, Office of Governor John Kitzhaber; Mike Green, Co-founder, Executive Director, ScaleUp America; Stephanie Powers, Sr. Director for Policy and Partnerships, Council on Foundations

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Fostering Philanthropy and Civil Society Globally

Jefferson West, Concourse Level

Philanthropy and civil society thrive in many parts of the world, providing hope and opportunity for millions. However, in some places, constraints on civil society and philanthropy are growing, thus restricting freedoms of association and assistance. Funders and government leaders must work more collaboratively to oppose these limitations and create a more enabling environment that assists our global neighbors in need. The Council on Foundations and the International Center for Non-Profit Law, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State, launched the Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society's Global Philanthropy Working Group in 2012. The Dialogue operates through working groups co-chaired by civil society representatives and senior U.S. Government officials. It is focused on topics including religion, foreign policy, women's empowerment, and labor, and allows the Department to work with a wide range of non-state actors in the U.S. and worldwide to channel recommendations into policy outcomes.

Join Dr. Tomicah Tillemann, the State Department's Senior Advisor for Civil Society and Emerging Democracies, Nicole Campbell, Deputy General Counsel, Open Society Foundations and Douglas Rutzen, President and CEO, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law for an interactive audience discussion about how through this innovative public-private partnership, philanthropy and government are working together to protect and support a thriving civic ecosystem worldwide. During the session, the discussants will seek audience responses to questions. We encourage you review these questions and come prepared to offer insight that will inform the working group's efforts on behalf of philanthropy and civil society in the coming year.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): A. Campbell, Deputy General Counsel, Open Society Foundations; Douglas Rutzen, President, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law; Tomicah Tillemann, Senior Advisor to the Secretary of State for Civil Society &Emerging Democracies, U.S. State Department

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Growing to Scale: Using a Digital Platform for Youth Civic Participation

Columbia Hall, Terrace Level

Learning Lab in Council Central

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

It's the Community, Stupid. Not the Government!

Columbia 8, Terrace Level

Session attendees will leave with a better understanding of the importance of developing a well-coordinated community response when veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan leave active military life to return to civilian lives. Veterans and military families will share the challenges they often meet when they return from war zones or arrive in new communities after transition. Getting lost in the maze of civilian life after years of regimented, highly structured lives in the military is not an unusual phenomenon. That first point of contact" can make a difference - between a successful integration or a spiral toward isolation, frustration, and fear about the future. Foundations working with partners to develop soft landing strategies, such as faith-based organizations and veterans service organizations, will share how they are helping veterans open new life chapters after their service to the nation.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Melissa Beach, Director, Training & Services, San Antonio Area Foundation; Donald Cooke, Senior Vice President of Philanthropy, McCormick Foundation; Patricia Haley, Mission Continues Fellow, Volunteers of America - Headquarters; Betsy Schwartz, Vice President for Public Education and Strategic Initiatives, National Council For Community Behavioral Healthcare

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Mastering Key Elements of 21st Century Talent Management

Lincoln East, Concourse Level

Is your foundation attracting, retaining, and inspiring the very best performance from your staff? In this session, you will learn about proven strategies in recruiting, onboarding, and developing an inclusive leadership pipeline. Participants will engage in a dynamic and pragmatic interactive discussion about strategies for attracting and nurturing the very best people needed to tackle the difficult challenges facing philanthropy in the 21st Century. You will leave this session with fresh ideas, colleague connections and practical tools you can begin implementing right away.

Speaker(s): Samantha Gilbert, Vice President of Talent and Human Resources, Ford Foundation; Dianna Langenburg, Director of Human Resources and Organizational Services, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Jean McCall, Director of Human Resources, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; Pratichi Shah, President and CEO, Flourish Talent Management Solutions, LLC

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

The Power of Place: Social Change in the Second Century of Community Philanthropy

Jefferson East, Concourse Level

Many foundations, including community foundations, are committed to place. Their work and approach connects their mission to local needs, opportunities, leadership, and values. While resources may vary, all place-based philanthropic institutions are leveraging complete capital and local assets to affect social change. This workshop will explore how to partner with foundations and other stakeholders in this work.

Session Materials :

Speaker(s): Matthew Bogoshian, Senior Policy Counsel, Environmental Protection Agency; Sheri Brady, Director of Policy, The Aspen Institute; Tamara Copeland, President, Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers; Nike Irvin, Vice President, Programs, California Community Foundation

10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Networking Break in Council Central

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Closing Plenary: Finding Common Ground to Advance the Common Good

International Ballroom, Concourse Level

Based on their successful USA Today column "Common Ground," political speakers Bob Beckel (a liberal Democratic strategist) and Cal Thomas (a conservative columnist) take on the most controversial issues of the day. Whether it's the Tea Party, unions, health care, or regulatory issues, Beckel and Thomas cut through the bickering and get to the heart of what really matters.

Departing from the archaic crossfire format, Beckel and Thomas find shared beliefs that both liberals and conservatives can agree upon. More like a conversation between friends than debate between enemies, they inspire audiences to find common ground in their own beliefs and to put aside politics as usual. Their book, Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America, expands on their writing in USA Today and is a discussion of how liberals and conservatives can work together to put America back on track.

12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Corporate Post-Conference Program - Corporate Philanthropy's Next Chapter - Issues Focus Groups

Georgetown West, Concourse Level

Now that you've attended the conference and heard from the experts, join corporate philanthropy peers and colleagues to chart the next chapter for corporate philanthropy. Lend your expertise to explore opportunities and chart the course for cross-sector, cross-constituency thought partnerships and to advance issues of specific concern for the corporate sector and the philanthropic field.

Speaker(s): Jennifer Chavez Rubio, Director, Gifts & Grants Management, Strategic Partnerships, United States Peace Corps; Wendy Hawkins, Executive Director, Intel Foundation; Caroline Mahfood, Executive Director, GraceKennedy Foundation