Community Foundations

Community foundations are grantmaking public charities that are dedicated to improving the lives of people in a defined local geographic area. They bring together the financial resources of individuals, families, and businesses to support effective nonprofits in their communities. Community foundations vary widely in asset size, ranging from less than $100,000 to more than $1.7 billion.

Community foundations play a key role in identifying and solving community problems. In 2011, they gave an estimated $4.3 billion to a variety of nonprofit activities in fields that included the arts and education, health and human services, the environment, and disaster relief. The Community Foundations National Standards Board confirms operational excellence in six key areas—mission, structure, and governance; resource development; stewardship and accountability; grantmaking and community leadership; donor relations; and communications. Foundations that comply with these standards can display the official National Standards Seal. Right now nearly 500 community foundations have earned the seal.

More than 750 community foundations operate in urban and rural areas in every state in the United States; currently, more than 570 belong to the Council on Foundations. The community foundation model also has taken hold around the world. According to the 2010 Community Foundation Global Status Report, there are 1,680 community foundations in 51 countries. Forty-six percent exist outside of the United States. You can use our Community Foundation Locator to view a list of community foundations in the United States.

Below is everything on our site for community foundations. We highly recommend that you use the navigation or our search feature to find what you're looking for on our site.

Independent Sector, the Council on Foundations, and the National Council of Nonprofits, collectively representing tens of thousands of charitable and philanthropic organizations, are unified in opposition to the final tax legislation. 

Season’s greetings from the Global Philanthropy team here at the Council! It finally feels like winter in D.C. and we’ve even had a taste of snow.

Across the world, 2017 has been a year of change and transition. As the year ends, I’ve been reflecting on our program’s impact in 2017, especially as we plan for next year. Here are highlights from this year and sneak peeks into projects we are excited about for 2018.

As 2017 comes to a close, I’ve been reflecting on how much I’ve learned from you this year.

When I transitioned to the role of Director of Community Philanthropy in 2016, from running a community foundation in Indiana, it was extremely important to me that I spoke to community foundation leaders about the present and future needs of our field. My goal was to use what I learned to create a focused learning journey and connections to topics and issues that are important to you.

December 18, 2017

With differing versions of the tax bill having passed the House and Senate, the two chambers needed to negotiate a single version through the conference committee process.

The conferees were:

House Conferees: Kevin Brady (R-TX), Fred Upton (R-MI); Rob Bishop (R-UT); Devin Nunes (R-CA); Peter Roskam (R-IL); Diane Black (R-TN); Kristi Noem (R-SD); Don Young (R-AK); John Shimkus (R-IL); Richard Neal (D-MA); Sandy Levin (D-MI); Lloyd Doggett (D-TX); Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ); Kathy Castor (D-FL).

Disaster Overview

In December 2017, nearly 9,000 wildfires tore through the State of California, burning 1.2 million acres of land, destroying more than 10,800 structures and killing at least 46 people.

Source: Washington Post