Private Foundations

Private foundations make grants based on charitable endowments. The endowment funds come from one or a small handful of sources -- an individual, a family or a corporation. Because of their endowments, they are focused primarily on grantmaking and generally do not raise funds or seek public financial support the way public charities (like community foundations) must.

“Private foundation” is the umbrella term that includes corporate, independent, family, and operating foundations.  As of 2011, there were 73,764 private foundations in the United States (Foundation Center, 2011).  

In 2011, private foundations held more than $604 billion in assets and gave away more than $45 billion (Foundation Center, 2011).  

Below is everything on our site for private foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

The OZ program is intended to spur long-term investments in low-income census tracts in the U.S. The new law allows investors to place unrealized capital gains (a profit from an investment that hasn’t yet been sold) into authorized O Funds that invest capital into OZs. The greatest benefits would go to investors who invest for 10 or more years. Learn more from the Mission Investors Exchange about the benefits, risks, and potential of opportunity zones.

With the creation of the federal Opportunity Zones incentive program, trillions of dollars in new private investment will flow into pre-designated low-income communities around the country. But will this investment benefit the people living in these communities now, or will they be displaced as new interest and development brings increased property values and rents? And what kind of development will result —unsustainable, car-dependent sprawl (the dominant growth paradigm in the United States today) or walkable, mixed-use communities with a variety of housing options for everyone?

Treasury and IRS have issued an initial set of proposed regulations and guidance on how the Qualified Opportunity Zone tax benefits under IRC 1400Z-2 (including the certification of Qualified Opportunity Funds and eligible investments in Qualified Opportunity Zones) will be administered.

Led by Bryan Del Rosario, Staff Counsel for the Council on Foundations, and Lindsay Mason, Director of Corporate Philanthropy, this workshop is organized to ensure common legal questions for administering grants, board governance and charitable giving activities are addressed. Bryan will provide technical and practical understanding of complex rules and regulations impacting private and corporate foundations/giving programs.

In April 2017, the Veterans Philanthropy Exchange, a veterans funders’ network hosted by the Council on Foundations, devoted a portion of its fifth annual convening to discuss what interests, challenges, and needs might drive a future agenda in veterans’ philanthropy. While the deliberation process continues around the idea of a national agenda for the sector, this document summarizes insights and ideas from that recent discussion, and is intended to contribute philanthropic thought for the George W. Bush Institute’s Stand-To/National Veterans Convening on June 22-23, 2017.

“White Oak” is the informal name used to denote a series of conferences originally titled “America Joins Forces for Military Families” and initially held at the White Oak plantation in Jacksonville, FL in 2010 and 2012. White Oak retreats encourage creative thinking, collaboration and relationship-building across sectors in support of military members, veterans, their families, caregivers and survivors among the major non-profit military service organizations, related government offices, and other key philanthropic partners and contributors to this cause.