Public Foundations

Public foundations are grantmaking public charities that gain their funds from a variety of sources, which may include foundations, individuals, corporations, or public entities. Public foundations may engage in fundraising, and may seek broad public financial support. They may or may not have endowments. There is no legal definition of a public foundation, but most dedicate a significant portion of their annual budgets to grantmaking. Most community foundations are also grantmaking public charities.

Since public foundations may be defined in different ways, and there is no official IRS or legal definition of public foundations, it is difficult to arrive at statistics that are fully representative of the field.

Below is everything on our site for public foundations. You can use the filtering options on the right to narrow these results.

How is philanthropy critical in bridging divides?

You can become an impact investor today. This guide created by The Philanthropic Initiative will help you learn the different options you have for aligning your financial assets with your social goals to help for-profit and non-profit social benefit organizations become stronger and more sustainable. If you're an individual, family or foundation intrigued by the opportunities presented through impact investing, this guide will help you get started.

 

If you have any questions, pleae email legal@cof.org.

Topics included regulations like the Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA), Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), US Treasury’s voluntary anti-terrorism guidelines and more.

The Reports present timely information on national laws and regulations affecting philanthropy. Each report was authored by a local expert in partnership with ICNL.

Enacted in January 2017, China’s Foreign Non-Governmental Organisation Management Law (“FNGO Law”) has been interpreted as the clearest evidence of “shrinking spaces” for civil society in China. This paper, by GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, assess the wider implications of the new institutional environment for foreign as well as domestic nonprofit organizations in China.

Nonprofit foundation boards often discount the need for ‘D&O’ Insurance. They tend to think because they don’t have shareholders their directors won’t be sued. That’s not the case. Foundations serve large and varied constituencies to whom their boards owe specific duties similar to the duties owed by corporate boards.

Potential claimants in suits against nonprofit directors include:

Hosted by the Council on Foundations and the Veterans Philanthropy Exchange, organizers announced more than $106 million in new commitments to strengthen services and support for veterans and military families nationwide. Check out the full plenary program!