Values-Aligned Philanthropy

Anti-democratic extremism, hate speech, and politically-motivated violence are on the rise. With policymakers, journalists, and activists seeking to determine how hate groups are funded, philanthropic organizations have come under a magnifying glass. Our members have been actively engaged in addressing the issue of hate-funding, including by sharing their resources and asking for additional insight.

In response, we launched the Values-Aligned Philanthropy project. We developed a white paper, Values-Aligned Philanthropy: Foundations Resisting Hate and Extremism, and this accompanying resource hub. Below, find a living list of resources for foundations looking to address this issue, including sample policies from a variety of foundations, organizational resources, and background information.  

If you have any questions or a resource to share, please email Nidale Zouhir.

In-Depth knowledge on Values-Aligned Philanthropy

All proposals to the Gill Foundation must include a board-approved copy of the organization’s employment nondiscrimination policy which expressly includes “sexual orientation” and “gender expression” or “gender identity” as protected classes.

For those monitoring the impact of extremism, hate and political polarization on societies around the world, the United States is now just another case study in conflict and fragility. The massacre of 50 Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand, shook the small nation to its core — as people around the world bore witness to this horrific act of violence, which was live-streamed on social media platforms that enable hate.

Is hate speech constitutionally protected? Do groups that express hate in their words and deeds deserve tax-exempt status? Is the IRS equipped to judge what is hate and what is merely odious? Does it even matter? The House Ways & Means Oversight Subcommittee held a hearing on this fraught subject last week. And the answers, it turns out, are very complicated.

The U.S. Capitol insurrection and the deeply politicized impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump put into sharp focus that America’s body politic is seriously ill. We are, in fact, contending with parallel pandemics. While our political malady may be less immediately deadly than the coronavirus, it could prove just as dangerous to our institutions, our civic life, and our nation’s long-term well-being.

Bob Jones University recently announced that it will regain its tax-exempt 501(c)(3) status on March 1, 2017. The University lost its tax exemption more than 30 years ago in a landmark Supreme Court case, Bob Jones University v. United States, 461 U.S. 574 (1983), due to racially discriminatory policies that it had at the time. This case is best-known for the adoption of the “Public Policy Doctrine” in the context of Section 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations, which is getting debated these days in the context of same-sex marriage.